Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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. Justice should be administered to the guilty  , Generals, Judges, and others who have  murdered, plundered and driven us; and those who  have suffered should be restored to their rights and to  their possessions, and the damages should be paid  them. Mark the saying, I am opposed to the unlaw ful proceedings of the highest authorities of ,  and would glory in laying down my life in opposing  such abominations.
But to return to my narrative: At the close of the  Court of Inquiry, some twenty or thirty were dismis sed, among whom were , one of our num ber who had been with us in our captivity, and in our  chains: and some twenty others were let to bail; and  Messrs. Joseph Smith, Jr., , , , and , were committed to the jail of , on the charge of treason. And Messrs. Morris  Phelps, , , Norman  Shearer, and , were committed to the jail of  , being accused of defending ourselves in  the battle with and his company.
This done, the civil and military authorities dis persed, and the troubled waters became a little  more tranquil. As our people were compelled by  the memorable treaty of , to leave the   by the following spring, they now commenced  moving by hundreds and by thousands, to the State  of , where they were received in the most hu mane and friendly manner by the authorities, and by  the citizens in general. Mean time, bands of mur derers, thieves and robbers, were roaming unrestrain ed among our unarmed and defenceless citizens;  committing all manner of plunder, and driving off cat tle, sheep and horses—abusing and insulting women,  etc.
My wife and children soon came to me in prison,  and spent most of the winter with me in the dark, [p. 55]
. Justice should be administered to the guilty , Generals, Judges, and others who have murdered, plundered and driven us; and those who have suffered should be restored to their rights and to their possessions, and the damages should be paid them. Mark the saying, I am opposed to the unlawful proceedings of the highest authorities of , and would glory in laying down my life in opposing such abominations.
But to return to my narrative: At the close of the Court of Inquiry, some twenty or thirty were dismissed, among whom were , one of our number who had been with us in our captivity, and in our chains: and some twenty others were let to bail; and Messrs. Joseph Smith, Jr., , , , and , were committed to the jail of , on the charge of treason. And Messrs. Morris Phelps, , , Norman Shearer, and , were committed to the jail of , being accused of defending ourselves in the battle with and his company.
This done, the civil and military authorities dispersed, and the troubled waters became a little more tranquil. As our people were compelled by the memorable treaty of , to leave the by the following spring, they now commenced moving by hundreds and by thousands, to the State of , where they were received in the most humane and friendly manner by the authorities, and by the citizens in general. Mean time, bands of murderers, thieves and robbers, were roaming unrestrained among our unarmed and defenceless citizens; committing all manner of plunder, and driving off cattle, sheep and horses—abusing and insulting women, etc.
My wife and children soon came to me in prison, and spent most of the winter with me in the dark, [p. 55]
Page 55