Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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been written by , of , to the  delegation from that county in the General Assembly,  now in session, from which the following is an extract:  ‘Humanity to an injured people prompts me at present  to address you this. You were aware of the treatment  (to some extent fefore you left home) received by that un fortunate race of beings called Mormons, from devils in  the form of human beings, inhabiting , and a part of counties. Not being satisfied  with a relinquishment of all their rights as citizens and  human beings, in the treaty forced upon them by , by giving up their arms and throwing themselves  upon the mercy of the and their follow citizens  generally, hoping thereby protection of their lives and  property, they are now receiving treatment from those  demons which makes humanity shudder, and the cold  chills run over any man not entirely destitute of humani ty. These demons are now strolling up and down in small companies, armed; insulting the  women in any and every way, and plundering the Mor mons of all the means of subsistence, (scanty as it was)  left them, and driving off their cattle, horses, hogs, &c.,  and rifling their houses and farms of every thing thereon,  taking beds, bedding, wardrobes and such things as they  see they want, leaving the Mormons in a starving and  naked condition. These are facts I have from authority  that cannot be questioned, and can be maintained and  substantiated at any time.’
The above needs no comment, it tells its own story in  language which will melt the heart of every true Ameri can. I will now give a piece which appeared in the (Mo.) Saturday News, and leave the reader to  contrast the two, and draw his own conclusions as to our  being a self afflicted people, or as to our having much  chance to live by labor:
The Mormons.—That self-afflicted class of people,  which has chosen the fancy name of Mormons, has elicit ed some sympathy and well intended compassion from  some of our charitable citizens, and two meetings have  been called to devise means of relieving their present [p. 71]
been written by , of , to the delegation from that county in the General Assembly, now in session, from which the following is an extract: ‘Humanity to an injured people prompts me at present to address you this. You were aware of the treatment (to some extent fefore you left home) received by that unfortunate race of beings called Mormons, from devils in the form of human beings, inhabiting , and a part of counties. Not being satisfied with a relinquishment of all their rights as citizens and human beings, in the treaty forced upon them by , by giving up their arms and throwing themselves upon the mercy of the and their follow citizens generally, hoping thereby protection of their lives and property, they are now receiving treatment from those demons which makes humanity shudder, and the cold chills run over any man not entirely destitute of humanity. These demons are now strolling up and down in small companies, armed; insulting the women in any and every way, and plundering the Mormons of all the means of subsistence, (scanty as it was) left them, and driving off their cattle, horses, hogs, &c., and rifling their houses and farms of every thing thereon, taking beds, bedding, wardrobes and such things as they see they want, leaving the Mormons in a starving and naked condition. These are facts I have from authority that cannot be questioned, and can be maintained and substantiated at any time.’
The above needs no comment, it tells its own story in language which will melt the heart of every true American. I will now give a piece which appeared in the (Mo.) Saturday News, and leave the reader to contrast the two, and draw his own conclusions as to our being a self afflicted people, or as to our having much chance to live by labor:
The Mormons.—That self-afflicted class of people, which has chosen the fancy name of Mormons, has elicited some sympathy and well intended compassion from some of our charitable citizens, and two meetings have been called to devise means of relieving their present [p. 71]
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