Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ery; and in a very short time, were beginning to enjoy the comforts  of life. The emigration continued without any particular interruption,  until they began to be numerous in the and surrounding coun ties. This order of things continued until 1836, three years; there  was no violence offered, but there were threatenings of violence. But  in the summer of 1836, these threatenings began to assume a more  serious form; from threats, public meetings were called, resolutions  passed; and affairs assumed a fearful attitude. They began to arm  themselves, and prepare for violence; threatening vengeance and de struction on all who did not leave the forthwith. had been successful; and seeing the authorities did not inter fere, they boasted that they would not do it in this instance; and they  could drive the saints as they pleased, and take their property; for  they could get no law in . They not only said that they  would drive them from the , but from the also: and it was  seriously talked of in , that the saints must leave the  ; and they carried it so far as to publish their intentions in the  papers.
While these warlike preparations were going on by the mob, the  saints also began to make preparations for defence. But it was then,  as before, they did not do it until they had petitioned the  for protection; when, instead of receiving the protection sought for,  they received for answer, “Vox populi, Vox Dei.” “The voice of  the people is the voice of God.” As much as to say, “If the people  say you must go, you must go.” The before mentioned was still Governor. The saints, finding they had nothing  to expect from the authorities, but a full sanction of the acts of the  mob; had no alternative left, but to have recourse to arms.
Both parties began to assume a formidable attitude, so much so,  that it gave alarm to some of the other citizens, who did not join with  the mob: they interfered, and tried to stop, as they said, the effusion  of blood. During this time, there was a body of armed men, from  sixty to one hundred, who, in the face of the authorities of the coun try and all civil law, was ranging the , stopping movers, driv ing them back, whipping and abusing the saints wherever they could  be caught; and threatening the chastity of females. , the  circuit judge, was an eye witness to these base transactions, and under  the solemnities of an oath, to put a stop to them: so were all the civil  authorities of the country, yet, every man of them, regardless of his  oath, either took an active part in aiding this band, or else winked at  their doings. The operations of this mob, was from the  first of May, till the last of August, 1836, from three to four months.  They did a great deal of mischief—were the cause of many deaths:  many persons were beaten most inhumanly; much property also was  destroyed; families that were moving into the country, were stopped,  many of them driven back, and compelled to live in their wagons  until houses could be obtained; and when obtained, they were in  sickly places; the consequence of which was, that many not only  sickened but died.
In , it was the same as in ; the authorities  refused to interfere, and let the mob range uncontrolled, and commit  all the outrages they pleased; and so far from any punishment, they [p. 13]
ery; and in a very short time, were beginning to enjoy the comforts of life. The emigration continued without any particular interruption, until they began to be numerous in the and surrounding counties. This order of things continued until 1836, three years; there was no violence offered, but there were threatenings of violence. But in the summer of 1836, these threatenings began to assume a more serious form; from threats, public meetings were called, resolutions passed; and affairs assumed a fearful attitude. They began to arm themselves, and prepare for violence; threatening vengeance and destruction on all who did not leave the forthwith. had been successful; and seeing the authorities did not interfere, they boasted that they would not do it in this instance; and they could drive the saints as they pleased, and take their property; for they could get no law in . They not only said that they would drive them from the , but from the also: and it was seriously talked of in , that the saints must leave the ; and they carried it so far as to publish their intentions in the papers.
While these warlike preparations were going on by the mob, the saints also began to make preparations for defence. But it was then, as before, they did not do it until they had petitioned the for protection; when, instead of receiving the protection sought for, they received for answer, “Vox populi, Vox Dei.” “The voice of the people is the voice of God.” As much as to say, “If the people say you must go, you must go.” The before mentioned was still Governor. The saints, finding they had nothing to expect from the authorities, but a full sanction of the acts of the mob; had no alternative left, but to have recourse to arms.
Both parties began to assume a formidable attitude, so much so, that it gave alarm to some of the other citizens, who did not join with the mob: they interfered, and tried to stop, as they said, the effusion of blood. During this time, there was a body of armed men, from sixty to one hundred, who, in the face of the authorities of the country and all civil law, was ranging the , stopping movers, driving them back, whipping and abusing the saints wherever they could be caught; and threatening the chastity of females. , the circuit judge, was an eye witness to these base transactions, and under the solemnities of an oath, to put a stop to them: so were all the civil authorities of the country, yet, every man of them, regardless of his oath, either took an active part in aiding this band, or else winked at their doings. The operations of this mob, was from the first of May, till the last of August, 1836, from three to four months. They did a great deal of mischief—were the cause of many deaths: many persons were beaten most inhumanly; much property also was destroyed; families that were moving into the country, were stopped, many of them driven back, and compelled to live in their wagons until houses could be obtained; and when obtained, they were in sickly places; the consequence of which was, that many not only sickened but died.
In , it was the same as in ; the authorities refused to interfere, and let the mob range uncontrolled, and commit all the outrages they pleased; and so far from any punishment, they [p. 13]
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