Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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selves at , had to give up to a mob and leave the place, not withstanding the militia were called out for their protection. From   the mob went towards , and while on their  way there they took two of our men prisoners and made them ride  upon the cannon, and told them that they would drive the Mormons  from to and from to hell, and that they  would give them no quarter only at the cannon’s mouth. The threats  of the mob induced some of our people to go to to help to pro tect their brethren who had settled at , on .
The mob soon fled from ; and after they were dis persed and the cannon taken, during which time no blood was shed,  the people of returned to their homes in hopes of enjoying  peace and quiet; but in this they were disappointed, for a large mob  was soon found to be collecting on the Grindstone, from ten to fifteen  miles off, under the command of , a scouting party of  which came within four miles of , and drove off stock be longing to our people, in open daylight. About this time word came  to that a party of the mob had come into  to the south of —that they were taking horses and cattle— burning houses, and ordering the inhabitants to leave their homes im mediately—and that they had then actually in their possession three  men prisoners. This report reached in the evening and  was confirmed about midnight. A company of about sixty men went  forth under the command of to disperse the mob, as  they supposed. A battle was the result, in which  and two of his men were killed, and others wounded. , it ap pears, had but one killed and others wounded. Notwithstanding the  unlawful acts committed by ’s men previous to the  battle, it is now asserted and claimed that he was regularly ordered  out as a militia captain, to preserve the peace along the line of  and counties. That battle was fought four or five days pre vious to the arrival of and his army. About the time of  the battle with , a number of our people who were  living near Haunn’s [Hawn’s] mill, on , about twenty miles below  , together with a number of emigrants who had been stop ped there in consequence of the excitement, made an agreement with  the mob which was about there, that neither party would molest the  other, but dwell in peace. Shortly after this agreement was made, a  mob from two to three hundred, many of whom are supposed to be  from , some from and also those who had  agreed to dwell in peace, came upon our people there, whose number  in men was about forty, at a time they little expected any such thing,  and without any ceremony, notwithstanding they begged for quarters,  shot them down as they would tigers or panthers. Some few made  their escape by fleeing. Eighteen were killed, and a number more,  severely wounded.
This tragedy was conducted in the most brutal and savage manner.  An old man, after the massacre was partially over, threw himself into  their hands and begged for quarters, when he was instantly shot down;  that not killing him, they took an old corn cutter and literally man gled him to pieces. A lad of ten years of age, after being shot down,  also begged to be spared, when [one] of them placed the muzzle of his gun [p. 55]
selves at , had to give up to a mob and leave the place, notwithstanding the militia were called out for their protection. From the mob went towards , and while on their way there they took two of our men prisoners and made them ride upon the cannon, and told them that they would drive the Mormons from to and from to hell, and that they would give them no quarter only at the cannon’s mouth. The threats of the mob induced some of our people to go to to help to protect their brethren who had settled at , on .
The mob soon fled from ; and after they were dispersed and the cannon taken, during which time no blood was shed, the people of returned to their homes in hopes of enjoying peace and quiet; but in this they were disappointed, for a large mob was soon found to be collecting on the Grindstone, from ten to fifteen miles off, under the command of , a scouting party of which came within four miles of , and drove off stock belonging to our people, in open daylight. About this time word came to that a party of the mob had come into to the south of —that they were taking horses and cattle—burning houses, and ordering the inhabitants to leave their homes immediately—and that they had then actually in their possession three men prisoners. This report reached in the evening and was confirmed about midnight. A company of about sixty men went forth under the command of to disperse the mob, as they supposed. A battle was the result, in which and two of his men were killed, and others wounded. , it appears, had but one killed and others wounded. Notwithstanding the unlawful acts committed by ’s men previous to the battle, it is now asserted and claimed that he was regularly ordered out as a militia captain, to preserve the peace along the line of and counties. That battle was fought four or five days previous to the arrival of and his army. About the time of the battle with , a number of our people who were living near Haunn’s [Hawn’s] mill, on , about twenty miles below , together with a number of emigrants who had been stopped there in consequence of the excitement, made an agreement with the mob which was about there, that neither party would molest the other, but dwell in peace. Shortly after this agreement was made, a mob from two to three hundred, many of whom are supposed to be from , some from and also those who had agreed to dwell in peace, came upon our people there, whose number in men was about forty, at a time they little expected any such thing, and without any ceremony, notwithstanding they begged for quarters, shot them down as they would tigers or panthers. Some few made their escape by fleeing. Eighteen were killed, and a number more, severely wounded.
This tragedy was conducted in the most brutal and savage manner. An old man, after the massacre was partially over, threw himself into their hands and begged for quarters, when he was instantly shot down; that not killing him, they took an old corn cutter and literally mangled him to pieces. A lad of ten years of age, after being shot down, also begged to be spared, when one of them placed the muzzle of his gun [p. 55]
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