Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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By this removal, the saints lost nearly all they had obtained during the previous three years, which they had resided in ; besides much abuse at the hand of the wretches who had risen up in arms against them. At the succeeding session of the legislature, there was a new county laid off, embracing the before mentioned tract of land, called . A town was soon laid off and incorporated, called “;” and in one year, there was one hundred and fifty houses built,—besides, nearly the whole was entered, or at least, that part of it, which could be cultivated; as there was a great scarcity of timber in the .
In all these operations, there was no pretence to law, they openly declared that they put the law at defiance, saying, “we are the law, and what we say is the constitution.”
The saints being once more settled; they commenced improving the country, which was so great a contrast to the general idleness and lazy habits of the Missourians, which any person with the least discernment could readily discover. This, soon began to excite the jealousies of the surrounding Counties; for nothing can so much excite the jealousy of that people, nor awaken their indignation so much, as to have an intelligent, industrious, and enterprising people, settle any where in the , where they live. Threatenings were again heard from , , Clinton, Platt and Counties, that they were going to raise another mob and come and drive the citizens out of . The immigration was so rapid, and so great, that in the space of eighteen months after the first settlement in , there was not room enough for the people in that , and they were under the necessity of seeking habitations some where else; and a number went into , which was north of , Soon after the settlements commenced in , a mob made its appearance, forbidding them to settle there under pain of death. However, this was not regarded, and the settlements which were made in different parts of the , were increasing daily, until one or two whole townships were entered, besides large bodies of land, [p. 16]
By this removal, the saints lost nearly all they had obtained during the previous three years, which they had resided in ; besides much abuse at the hand of the wretches who had risen up in arms against them. At the succeeding session of the legislature, there was a new county laid off, embracing the before mentioned tract of land, called . A town was soon laid off and incorporated, called “;” and in one year, there was one hundred and fifty houses built,—besides, nearly the whole was entered, or at least, that part of it, which could be cultivated; as there was a great scarcity of timber in the .
In all these operations, there was no pretence to law, they openly declared that they put the law at defiance, saying, “we are the law, and what we say is the constitution.”
The saints being once more settled; they commenced improving the country, which was so great a contrast to the general idleness and lazy habits of the Missourians, which any person with the least discernment could readily discover. This, soon began to excite the jealousies of the surrounding Counties; for nothing can so much excite the jealousy of that people, nor awaken their indignation so much, as to have an intelligent, industrious, and enterprising people, settle any where in the , where they live. Threatenings were again heard from , , Clinton, Platt and Counties, that they were going to raise another mob and come and drive the citizens out of . The immigration was so rapid, and so great, that in the space of eighteen months after the first settlement in , there was not room enough for the people in that , and they were under the necessity of seeking habitations some where else; and a number went into , which was north of , Soon after the settlements commenced in , a mob made its appearance, forbidding them to settle there under pain of death. However, this was not regarded, and the settlements which were made in different parts of the , were increasing daily, until one or two whole townships were entered, besides large bodies of land, [p. 16]
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