Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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But the case, having under gone a legal  investigation, had no tendency to stop the opperations  of the mob; but it tended clearly to show <how> much  sincerity there was in their pretended zeal for  the laws; for in open and avowed violations of them,  they went on to collect together and to gether into  , from , Carrill [Carroll], ,  Clinton, and Platt, and some from . Openly  declaring that they would put the laws at defiance,  and the saints should be driven out. They  in the mean time took their famlies away  from their houses, under pretence of fear, and  ran through the country, from county to  county, telling how they were driven from their  homes. Got up county meetings in the surrounding  counties, particularly , , Carrill,  and . At their meetings, would be  seen p[r]eaching of the gospel, as they called themse lves, drunkards, profane swearers, &c all for ming one company, and all declaring their  determination, to aid their friends, if necessary,  In one of these mob meetings in ,  was <seen> , States attorney, and  now one of the Judges, also , who would wish to be called a respectable [p. 16]
But the case, having under gone a legal investigation, had no tendency to stop the opperations of the mob; but it tended clearly to show how much sincerity there was in their pretended zeal for the laws; for in open and avowed violations of them, they went on to collect together and to gether into , from , Carrill [Carroll], , Clinton, and Platt, and some from . Openly declaring that they would put the laws at defiance, and the saints should be driven out. They in the mean time took their famlies away from their houses, under pretence of fear, and ran through the country, from county to county, telling how they were driven from their homes. Got up county meetings in the surrounding counties, particularly , , Carrill, and . At their meetings, would be seen preaching of the gospel, as they called themselves, drunkards, profane swearers, &c all forming one company, and all declaring their determination, to aid their friends, if necessary, In one of these mob meetings in , was seen , States attorney, and now one of the Judges, also , who would wish to be called a respectable [p. 16]
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