Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [31[b]]
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unexpecetedly, fell in with their guards, the guard fired, and killed one of <his> men. then ordered a rush. They immediately fell on them, the company fled very soon, but not untill was killed, and a man by the name of , The name of the one killed by the guard, was . reported, one killed, and a number wounded.
After this affray the men returned home. But all peace had fled away, mobbing parties were in every direction, at was dangerous for a man to go any distance from his house, if he did, and was on horse back, a gang of mobbers would take his horse from him, or if with wagon and team the wagon and team would be both taken, and this would be the last of them. These parties were throwing down fences, turning creatures in cornfields, turnip and potatoe patches. Some who were considered first <in> the country, were ingaged in this foul business. Such as , senator, Judge Smith, a judge in the court, and men of this <stamp> were not there <only,> but leaders, and excited others to acts of wickedness. [p. [31[b]]]
unexpecetedly, fell in with their guards, the guard fired, and killed one of his men. then ordered a rush. They immediately fell on them, the company fled very soon, but not untill was killed, and a man by the name of , The name of the one killed by the guard, was . reported, one killed, and a number wounded.
After this affray the men returned home. But all peace had fled away, mobbing parties were in every direction, at was dangerous for a man to go any distance from his house, if he did, and was on horse back, a gang of mobbers would take his horse from him, or if with wagon and team the wagon and team would be both taken, and this would be the last of them. These parties were throwing down fences, turning creatures in cornfields, turnip and potatoe patches. Some who were considered first in the country, were ingaged in this foul business. Such as , senator, Judge Smith, a judge in the court, and men of this stamp were not there only, but leaders, and excited others to acts of wickedness. [p. [31[b]]]
Page [31[b]]