Edward Partridge, History, Manuscript, circa 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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In a short time after the attor[n]eys left them they were informed  by that <the> judge had sent him <word> that the  grand juries witnesses nor <&> the guard were <not> wanted there any more <longer> soon paraded his men <as soon &> as well as he could for the crowd and  <immediately> marched off immediately the witnesses following <him> as well as they  could All hopes were now given up of ever bringing that people to  justice. <Their hatred towards the saints seemed to be unabating> they frequently <sent word> over to that they were comeing over  to drive the Saints from that place they even went so far as to  circulate a paper in they object of which was to obtain vol unteers in <there> to assist them in drving the<m> saints away. however  in the Jackson mobbers <they> had but a few friends for some time
In 1834 if we mistake not a<n> peaceable inoffensive man br. by the  name of Ira Willis <who belonged <among> to the saints> went into to hunt for a lost cow  <he was <taken> by the some of the> <some> the ruffians there took him <residing there who> and whipped him unmercifully  The same year Mr br. a man of great peaceable man went  to to see a man who owed him, on his way he was  discovered & overtaken by some few of that lawless banditti <banditti> who  beat him with hand spikes no doubt with an intent to kill him  but his life was preserved and he escaped out of their hands
Thus have that people unceasingly <abused &> persecuted the saints when ever they could get an opportunity
A wealthy farmer living in who was then friendly to the  saints and who was in the habit of sending flour & Whisky into   to sell, it generally being higher there than in , sent over  his negro & team with a load of of flour & Whisky They were  stopped on the road <by some of the good people of > and the flour & whisky barrels cut to pieces  with an ax and their contents wasted
appeared willing to guard back the saints  <to > at any time when they got ready to go but said that he had not  power <authority> to keep a guard their there for their protection They were  advised by many <some of the most> influential men <in the upper country> who were friendly towards  them though not believers in their faith to have enough of their  brn. emigrate to that country <to enable them> (so that they would have strength  enough) to maintain their rights should they <mob> ever attempt to  trample upon them again and then get the to set  them back upon their lands. Accordingly word was sent  forth to the churches to that effect and in the summer of  1834 a company <of about 200> came <went> from the eastern churches to for  that purpose— but few of them <however> moved their families because that they  knew not what the result would be— it was but an experiment [p. [16]]
In a short time after the attorneys left them they were informed by that the judge had sent him word that the witnesses & the guard were not wanted there any longer paraded his men as soon & as well as he could for the crowd and immediately marched off the witnesses following him All hopes were now given up of ever bringing that people to justice. Their hatred towards the saints seemed to be unabating they frequently sent word over to that they were comeing over to drive the Saints from that place they even went so far as to circulate a paper in the object of which was to obtain volunteers there to assist them in drving them away. however in they had but a few friends for some time
In 1834 if we mistake not an inoffensive br. by the name of Ira Willis went into to hunt for a lost cow he was taken by some of the ruffians residing there who whipped him unmercifully The same year br. a peaceable man went to to see a man who owed him, on his way he was discovered & overtaken by some few of that lawless banditti who beat him with hand spikes no doubt with an intent to kill him but his life was preserved and he escaped out of their hands
Thus have that people unceasingly abused & persecuted the saints whenever they could get an opportunity
A wealthy farmer living in who was then friendly to the saints and who was in the habit of sending flour & Whisky into to sell, it generally being higher there than in , sent over his negro & team with a load They were stopped on the road by some of the good people of and the flour & whisky barrels cut to pieces with an ax and their contents wasted
appeared willing to guard back the saints to at any time when they got ready to go but said that he had not authority to keep a guard there for their protection They were advised by some of the most influential men in the upper country who were friendly to them though not believers in their faith to have enough of their brn. emigrate to that country to enable them () to maintain their rights should the mob ever attempt to trample upon them again and then get the to set them back upon their lands. Accordingly word was sent forth to the churches to that effect and in the summer of 1834 a company of about 200 went from the eastern churches to for that purpose— but few of them however moved their families because that they knew not what the result would be— it was but an experiment [p. [16]]
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