Journal, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Editorial Note
Beginning in late June, malaria borne by the mosquitoes that infested the area’s swamplands spread among the Latter-day Saints. later recounted that “a majority of the people were prostrated with malignant fevers, agues, etc.” JS spent most of this week and much of the following month ministering to the sick. Having been recently driven from , many still lived in crowded, ramshackle accommodations. Zina Huntington, whose mother died of the sickness 8 July, later recounted that JS “saw to our being taken care of, as well as circumstances would permit—for there were hundreds, lying in tents and wagons, who needed care as much as we. Once Joseph came himself and made us tea with his own hands, and comforted the sick and dying.” Among the sick were JS’s and apparently his son . later recounted that JS “had taken the sick into his house and dooryard until his house was like an hospital, and he had attended upon them until he was taken sick himself and confined to his bed several days.”

8–20 July 1839 • Monday–Saturday

Monday Tuesday & Wednesday  selecting Hymns, with the
About this time sickiness began  to manifest itself much amongst the  brethren as well as among the inhab itants of the place, so that this week  and next was generally spent in  visiting the sick, and  unto them, some had faith enough  and were healed, others had not,

21 July 1839 • Sunday

Sunday the 21rst no meeting on  account of much rain, and much  sickness, however, many of the sick  were <on> this day, raised up by the power  of God, through the instrumentality  of the Elders of Israel in the name of Jesus Christ

22–23 July 1839 • Monday–Tuesday

Monday & Tuesday <also> the sick were  , with great success  but many still remain sick & new  cases occurring daily.

28 July–3 August 1839 • Sunday–Saturday

Sunday 28 meeting held as usual.  B[rother] , preached, on the  , and in the  evening afternoon  addressed the church, on the necessity  of keeping the commandments of God. [p. 9]

Editorial Note
Beginning in late June, malaria borne by the mosquitoes that infested the area’s swamplands spread among the Latter-day Saints. later recounted that “a majority of the people were prostrated with malignant fevers, agues, etc.” JS spent most of this week and much of the following month ministering to the sick. Having been recently driven from , many still lived in crowded, ramshackle accommodations. Zina Huntington, whose mother died of the sickness 8 July, later recounted that JS “saw to our being taken care of, as well as circumstances would permit—for there were hundreds, lying in tents and wagons, who needed care as much as we. Once Joseph came himself and made us tea with his own hands, and comforted the sick and dying.” Among the sick were JS’s and apparently his son . later recounted that JS “had taken the sick into his house and dooryard until his house was like an hospital, and he had attended upon them until he was taken sick himself and confined to his bed several days.”

8–20 July 1839 • Monday–Saturday

Monday Tuesday & Wednesday selecting Hymns, with the
About this time sickiness began to manifest itself much amongst the brethren as well as among the inhabitants of the place, so that this week and next was generally spent in visiting the sick, and unto them, some had faith enough and were healed, others had not,

21 July 1839 • Sunday

Sunday the 21rst no meeting on account of much rain, and much sickness, however, many of the sick were on this day, raised up by the power of God, through the instrumentality of the Elders of Israel in the name of Jesus Christ

22–23 July 1839 • Monday–Tuesday

Monday & Tuesday also the sick were , with great success but many still remain sick & new cases occurring daily.

28 July–3 August 1839 • Sunday–Saturday

Sunday 28 meeting held as usual. Brother , preached, on the , and in the afternoon addressed the church, on the necessity of keeping the commandments of God. [p. 9]
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