Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [12], bk. 2
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nature was exhausted and I was taken severly ill  myself Then who has always been remarkable  for the tenderness and sympathy desired that he might  take my place accordingly Joseph was laid upon  a low bed and sat beside him almost in cessantly day and night grasping the most painful  part of the affected leg between his hands and by pre ssing it closely in this maner the little sufferer  was enabled the better to bear the pain which  otherwise seemed almost ready to take his life  at the end of 3 weeks he became so bad that we  sent again for the doctor Surgeon who, when he came <made> cut  his leg open <an incision of 8 inches> on the front side of the leg between the <knee> and  ancle the distance of 8 inches and by continual dressing  his leg was somewhat releived untill the wound commenced  healing when the pain became as violent as ever the  surgeon again renewed the wound by cutting to the  bone the second time shortly it commenced healing  the second time and as the healing progressed  the swelling rose at last a councill of surgeons was  called it was decided that there was no remedy but  amputation When they rode up I went to the door &  invited them into another room apart from the one where  Joseph lay Now said <I> gentlemen (for there were 7 of them)  what can you do to save my boys leg They answered  we can do nothing we have cut it open to the bone  2 [times?] and find the bone so affected that it is incurable  but this was like a thunderbolt to me. I appealed  to the principle Surgeon <present> said I Doctor Stone can  you not try once more by cutting round the bone and  taking out the affected part there may be a part of  the bone that is sound which will heal over and thus  you may save the leg you will you must [not] take off  the leg till you try once more to save it I will  not consent to your entering his room till you promise this [p. [12], bk. 2]
nature was exhausted and I was taken severly ill myself Then who has always been remarkable for tenderness and sympathy desired that he might take my place accordingly Joseph was laid upon a low bed and sat beside him almost incessantly day and night grasping the most painful part of the affected leg between his hands and by pressing it closely in this maner the little sufferer was enabled the better to bear the pain which otherwise seemed almost ready to take his life at the end of 3 weeks he became so bad that we sent again for the Surgeon who, when he came made an incision of 8 inches on the front side of the leg between the knee and ancle the distance of 8 inches and by continual dressing his leg was somewhat releived untill the wound commenced healing when the pain became as violent as ever the surgeon again renewed the wound by cutting to the bone the second time shortly it commenced healing the second time and as the healing progressed the swelling rose at last a councill of surgeons was called it was decided that there was no remedy but amputation When they rode up I went to the door & invited them into another room apart from the one where Joseph lay Now said I gentlemen (for there were 7 of them) what can you do to save my boys leg They answered we can do nothing we have cut it open to the bone 2 [times] and find the bone so affected that it is incurable but this was like a thunderbolt to me. I appealed to the principle Surgeon present said I Doctor Stone can you not try once more by cutting round the bone and taking out the affected part there may be a part of the bone that is sound which will heal over and thus you may save the leg you will you must [not] take off the leg till you try once more I will not consent to your entering his room till you promise this [p. [12], bk. 2]
Page [12], bk. 2