Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ling house of & Co., and destroyed or  took possession of the press, type, books and property  of the establishment; at the same time turning and children out of doors, after which they pro ceeded to personal violence by a wanton assault and  battery upon the Bishop of the Church, Mr. , and a , whom they tarred and  feathered, and variously abused. They then com pelled Messrs. & Co. to close their  store and pack their goods, after which they adjourn ed to meet again on the 23rd of July; on which day  they again met, to the number of several hundred,  armed with fire-arms, dirks and sticks, with red flags  hoisted, and as they entered , threatening death  and destruction to the Mormons. On this day six in dividuals of the Church signed an agreement to leave  the , one half by the first of January, and the  other half by the first of April, 1834; hoping thereby  to preserve the lives of their brethren, and their pro perty. After this the mob dispersed, threatening de struction to the Mormons on the next New-Years’ day  if they were not off by that time.
After this, an express was sent to the of  the , stating the facts of the outrages, and pray ing for some relief and protection. But none was af forded, only some advice for us to prosecute the of fenders, which was accordingly undertaken. But  this so enraged the mob that they began to make  preparations to come out by night and re-commence  depredations. Having passed through the most ag gravating insults and injuries without making the  least resistance, a general enquiry prevailed at this  time throughout the Church, as to the propriety of  self-defence. Some claimed the right of defending  themselves, their families and property, from destruc tion; while others doubted the propriety of self de fence; and as the agreement of the 23d of July, be tween the two parties had been published to the [p. 12]
ling house of & Co., and destroyed or took possession of the press, type, books and property of the establishment; at the same time turning and children out of doors, after which they proceeded to personal violence by a wanton assault and battery upon the Bishop of the Church, Mr. , and a , whom they tarred and feathered, and variously abused. They then compelled Messrs. & Co. to close their store and pack their goods, after which they adjourned to meet again on the 23rd of July; on which day they again met, to the number of several hundred, armed with fire-arms, dirks and sticks, with red flags hoisted, and as they entered , threatening death and destruction to the Mormons. On this day six individuals of the Church signed an agreement to leave the , one half by the first of January, and the other half by the first of April, 1834; hoping thereby to preserve the lives of their brethren, and their property. After this the mob dispersed, threatening destruction to the Mormons on the next New-Years’ day if they were not off by that time.
After this, an express was sent to the of the , stating the facts of the outrages, and praying for some relief and protection. But none was afforded, only some advice for us to prosecute the offenders, which was accordingly undertaken. But this so enraged the mob that they began to make preparations to come out by night and re-commence depredations. Having passed through the most aggravating insults and injuries without making the least resistance, a general enquiry prevailed at this time throughout the Church, as to the propriety of self-defence. Some claimed the right of defending themselves, their families and property, from destruction; while others doubted the propriety of self defence; and as the agreement of the 23d of July, between the two parties had been published to the [p. 12]
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