Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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, &c. and when the mob saw them approach they  fled. But one of their number, a ,  was caught in the act of throwing rocks in at the  door, while the goods lay strung around him in the  street. He was immediately taken before , Esq. and a warrant requested, that said   might be secured; but his justiceship refused  to do any thing in the case, and was then  liberated.
The same night many of their houses had poles and  rails thrust through the shutters and sash, into the  rooms of defenceless women and children, from  whence their husbands and fathers had been driven  by the acts of the mob which were made by ten or  twenty men upon one house at a time. On Saturday,  the 2d of November, all the families of these people who  lived in , moved out of town about one  half mile west, and embodied for the preservation of  themselves and property. Saturday night a party of  the mob made an attack upon a settlement about six  miles west of town. Here they tore the roof from a  dwelling, broke open another house, found the owner,  Mr. David Bennet, sick in bed; him they beat inhu manly, and swore they would blow his brains out, and  discharging a pistol, the ball cut a deep gash across  the top of his head. In this skirmish one of their men  was shot in the thigh.
On Sunday evening, about sunset, and a   set out on horseback to visit the Circuit  Judge at Lexington, a distance of some forty miles.  We were under the necessity of going the most pri vate paths across the country, in order to avoid our  enemies; but we had a most faithful pilot, who knew  every crook and turn of the country. We had rode  but a few miles, when it became so extremely dark  that we could not see each other. Our pilot dismount ed several times and felt his way; but at length we  came to a halt, and lay down upon the ground until it [p. 15]
, &c. and when the mob saw them approach they fled. But one of their number, a , was caught in the act of throwing rocks in at the door, while the goods lay strung around him in the street. He was immediately taken before , Esq. and a warrant requested, that said might be secured; but his justiceship refused to do any thing in the case, and was then liberated.
The same night many of their houses had poles and rails thrust through the shutters and sash, into the rooms of defenceless women and children, from whence their husbands and fathers had been driven by the acts of the mob which were made by ten or twenty men upon one house at a time. On Saturday, the 2d of November, all the families of these people who lived in , moved out of town about one half mile west, and embodied for the preservation of themselves and property. Saturday night a party of the mob made an attack upon a settlement about six miles west of town. Here they tore the roof from a dwelling, broke open another house, found the owner, Mr. David Bennet, sick in bed; him they beat inhumanly, and swore they would blow his brains out, and discharging a pistol, the ball cut a deep gash across the top of his head. In this skirmish one of their men was shot in the thigh.
On Sunday evening, about sunset, and a set out on horseback to visit the Circuit Judge at Lexington, a distance of some forty miles. We were under the necessity of going the most private paths across the country, in order to avoid our enemies; but we had a most faithful pilot, who knew every crook and turn of the country. We had rode but a few miles, when it became so extremely dark that we could not see each other. Our pilot dismounted several times and felt his way; but at length we came to a halt, and lay down upon the ground until it [p. 15]
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