Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ing while the rest of the troop had to pass directly by  his dying body. It was dawn of day in the  eastern horizon, but darkness still hovered over the  awful scene. When our men saw that they were  ambushed and attacked, they found it too late to  retreat, and orders were issued to form along in the  brush, and under the cover of trees, which was in stantly done, while the enemy, though unseen, were  pouring in a deadly fire upon our whole line. We  soon returned the fire, and charging upon the enemy,  the whole wilderness seemed for a few moments as  if wrapped in a blaze of lightning; and overwhelmed  with the sharp crack of peals of thunder. The ene my were soon driven from their ambush and com pletely routed. Having a creek immediately in their  rear, many were seen forcing their retreat through  the stream, and up to their arms in water. The firing  now ceased, and the whole battle ground resounded  with the watchword, God and Liberty. Our forces  which had been thrown into some disorder, were in stantly formed, and their pieces reloaded, while here  and there over the battle ground, lay the dead and  wounded. The enemy had left their horses, saddles,  camp and baggage, in the confusion of their flight,  which fell into our hands. Their baggage waggon  was immediately harnessed to a couple of horses, and  the wounded were picked up and laid in it upon blan kets, while every man saddled and mounted a horse,  and we commenced our retreat to the place where we  had left our horses and guard, a distance of more than  a mile; here we halted, and laid our wounded upon  blankets, on the ground, while we made arrangements  in the waggon for them to ride more comfortably.—  There were about six of our men badly wounded,  among whom was the brave , a ball  having entered the lower part of his body. It was  an awful sight to see them pale and helpless, and  hear their groans. We had as yet lost but one man, [p. 35]
ing while the rest of the troop had to pass directly by his dying body. It was dawn of day in the eastern horizon, but darkness still hovered over the awful scene. When our men saw that they were ambushed and attacked, they found it too late to retreat, and orders were issued to form along in the brush, and under the cover of trees, which was instantly done, while the enemy, though unseen, were pouring in a deadly fire upon our whole line. We soon returned the fire, and charging upon the enemy, the whole wilderness seemed for a few moments as if wrapped in a blaze of lightning; and overwhelmed with the sharp crack of peals of thunder. The enemy were soon driven from their ambush and completely routed. Having a creek immediately in their rear, many were seen forcing their retreat through the stream, and up to their arms in water. The firing now ceased, and the whole battle ground resounded with the watchword, God and Liberty. Our forces which had been thrown into some disorder, were instantly formed, and their pieces reloaded, while here and there over the battle ground, lay the dead and wounded. The enemy had left their horses, saddles, camp and baggage, in the confusion of their flight, which fell into our hands. Their baggage waggon was immediately harnessed to a couple of horses, and the wounded were picked up and laid in it upon blankets, while every man saddled and mounted a horse, and we commenced our retreat to the place where we had left our horses and guard, a distance of more than a mile; here we halted, and laid our wounded upon blankets, on the ground, while we made arrangements in the waggon for them to ride more comfortably.— There were about six of our men badly wounded, among whom was the brave , a ball having entered the lower part of his body. It was an awful sight to see them pale and helpless, and hear their groans. We had as yet lost but one man, [p. 35]
Page 35