Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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forward in our carriages, while the troops were form ed in our front and rear, with quite a martial appear ance. As we went through the settlements, hun dreds of men, women, and children flocked to see us,  and our oft halted the whole brigade to intro duce us to the ladies and gentlemen, pointing out  each of his prisoners by name. We were oft shaken  by the hand; and, in the ladies at least, there often  appeared some feelings of sympathy. In this way  we proceeded until we arrived at . It  was now past noon, and in the midst of a great rain.  But hundreds crowded to witness the procession, and  to gaze at us as we were paraded in martial triumph  through all the principal streets—our carriages mov ing in the centre, while the brigade on horseback  were formed in front and rear, and the bugles sound ed a blast of triumphant joy.
This ceremony being finished, a vacant house was  prepared for our reception, into which we were usher ed through the crowd of spectators who thronged  every avenue. The troops were then disbanded, and  each returned to the bosom of his family, where, amid  the joys of domestic felicity, they rested from the  fatigues of war. In the mean time we were kept un der a small guard, and were treated with the greatest  hospitality and politeness, while thousands flocked to  see us day after day. We spent most of our time in  preaching and conversation, explanatory of our doc trines and practice, which removed mountains of  prejudice, and enlisted the populace in our favor, not withstanding their old hatred and wickdness toward  our Society.
We were soon at liberty to walk the streets with out a guard; and soon we were removed from our  house of confinement to a respectable hotel, where we  were entertained in the best style of which the place  was capable. We had no longer any guard; we  went out and came in when we pleased, a certain [p. 46]
forward in our carriages, while the troops were formed in our front and rear, with quite a martial appearance. As we went through the settlements, hundreds of men, women, and children flocked to see us, and our oft halted the whole brigade to introduce us to the ladies and gentlemen, pointing out each of his prisoners by name. We were oft shaken by the hand; and, in the ladies at least, there often appeared some feelings of sympathy. In this way we proceeded until we arrived at . It was now past noon, and in the midst of a great rain. But hundreds crowded to witness the procession, and to gaze at us as we were paraded in martial triumph through all the principal streets—our carriages moving in the centre, while the brigade on horseback were formed in front and rear, and the bugles sounded a blast of triumphant joy.
This ceremony being finished, a vacant house was prepared for our reception, into which we were ushered through the crowd of spectators who thronged every avenue. The troops were then disbanded, and each returned to the bosom of his family, where, amid the joys of domestic felicity, they rested from the fatigues of war. In the mean time we were kept under a small guard, and were treated with the greatest hospitality and politeness, while thousands flocked to see us day after day. We spent most of our time in preaching and conversation, explanatory of our doctrines and practice, which removed mountains of prejudice, and enlisted the populace in our favor, notwithstanding their old hatred and wickdness toward our Society.
We were soon at liberty to walk the streets without a guard; and soon we were removed from our house of confinement to a respectable hotel, where we were entertained in the best style of which the place was capable. We had no longer any guard; we went out and came in when we pleased, a certain [p. 46]
Page 46