Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 8[a]
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It was in the territory of . The  two Committees started tohunt ou seek out  a place for their removal; when they came  to the track tract of land which had been purch ased, it was agreed that, this that should  be the place of settlement. So the settlem ent commenced, immediately. This was in  the August of 1836.
By this removal, the saints <lost> near ly all they had obtained in the previous  three years, which they had resided in , besides much abuse at the hand  of the wretches who had risen up in arms  against <them>. At the succeeding cesion <sesion> of the  session of the legislature there was a new coun ty laid off, embraing embracing the before m entioned tract of land, called “;”  a town was soon laid off and incorporated, called  ;” and in one year, there were one  hundred and fifty houses built <in> it, besides  nearly the whole was entered, or at  lest <least> that part of it, which could be cultivated,  as there was a great scareeity <scarcity> of timber in the  .
In all these operations, there was no pretention  to law, they openly declared that they put the  law at defiance, saying “we are the law, and what  we say, is the constitution.”
The saints being once more settled;  they commenced improving the country, which  was so great a contrast, to the general idleness  and lazy habits of the Missourians, that the contra st was so great that every mortal <which any person> with the least  discernment could not but see it. This soon began [p. 8[a]]
It was in the territory of . The two Committees started to seek out a place for their removal; when they came to the tract of land which had been purchased, it was agreed that, that should be the place of settlement. So the settlement commenced, immediately. This was in the August of 1836.
By this removal, the saints lost nearly all they had obtained in the previous three years, which they had resided in , besides much abuse at the hand of the wretches who had risen up in arms against them. At the succeeding of the session of the legislature there was a new county laid off, embracing the before mentioned tract of land, called “;” a town was soon laid off and incorporated, called “;” and in one year, there were one hundred and fifty houses built in it, besides nearly the whole was entered, or at least that part of it, which could be cultivated, as there was a great scarcity of timber in the .
In all these operations, there was no pretention to law, they openly declared that they put the law at defiance, saying “we are the law, and what we say, is the constitution.”
The saints being once more settled; they commenced improving the country, which was so great a contrast, to the general idleness and lazy habits of the Missourians, that the contrast was so great which any person with the least discernment could not but see it. This soon began [p. 8[a]]
Page 8[a]