53991805

Revelation, 2 August 1833–B [D&C 94]

Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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2d August 1833
And again verely I say unto you my friends1

See John 15:14–15.  


a commandment

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

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I give unto you that ye shall commence a work of laying out and preparing a begining and foundation of the city of the stake

Ecclesiastical organization of church members in a particular locale. Stakes were typically large local organizations of church members; stake leaders could include a presidency, a high council, and a bishopric. Some revelations referred to stakes “to” or...

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of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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2

See Isaiah 54:2. In the summer of 1831, Jackson County, Missouri, was designated as Zion, the place appointed “for the gethering of the Saints.” A later revelation indicated that Kirtland, Ohio, would be interconnected with Jackson County as another place for gathering and as “a strong hold” for at least five years. (Revelation, 20 July 1831 [D&C 57:1]; Revelation, 11 Sept. 1831 [D&C 64:21–22].)  


[p. 64]
Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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2d August 1833
And again verely I say unto you my  friends1

See John 15:14–15.  


a commandment

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

View Glossary
I give unto  you that ye shall commence a work of laying  out and preparing a begining and  foundation of the city of the stake

Ecclesiastical organization of church members in a particular locale. Stakes were typically large local organizations of church members; stake leaders could include a presidency, a high council, and a bishopric. Some revelations referred to stakes “to” or...

View Glossary
of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
2

See Isaiah 54:2. In the summer of 1831, Jackson County, Missouri, was designated as Zion, the place appointed “for the gethering of the Saints.” A later revelation indicated that Kirtland, Ohio, would be interconnected with Jackson County as another place for gathering and as “a strong hold” for at least five years. (Revelation, 20 July 1831 [D&C 57:1]; Revelation, 11 Sept. 1831 [D&C 64:21–22].)  


[p. 64]
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By summer 1833, agents for the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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had purchased several large parcels of land in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio. In the months before this 2 August revelation was dictated, church leaders planned for and began construction on a House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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, or temple, on this newly acquired land, which was to serve as both a chapel and a schoolhouse.1

The primary piece of real estate the church acquired was the farm owned by Peter French. The French farm was originally purchased by land agent Joseph Coe on 10 April 1833. On 17 June 1833, it was deeded over to Kirtland bishop Newel K. Whitney. The House of the Lord was to be built on the southeast corner of the property, which would also be the center point of the plat map for the city of Kirtland. (Minutes, 23 Mar. 1833–A; Geauga Co., OH, Deed Records, 1795–1921, vol. 17, pp. 38–39, 359–360, 10 Apr. 1833; pp. 360–361, 17 June 1833, microfilm 20,237, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; see also Minutes, 4 June 1833; Revelation, 4 June 1833 [D&C 96:2]; and Plat of Kirtland, OH, not before 2 Aug. 1833.)  


The presidency of the high priesthood

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

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was assigned to “obtain a draft or construction” for the interior of the building. Three weeks after the presidency received their assignment to create a design for the Kirtland temple, they sent to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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church leaders the architectural plans for another House of the Lord

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

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, similar in style and purpose, to be built in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Jackson County, Missouri. They also sent a plat for an expansive “City of Zion

Also referred to as New Jerusalem. JS revelation, dated Sept. 1830, prophesied that “city of Zion” would be built among Lamanites (American Indians). JS directed Oliver Cowdery and other missionaries preaching among American Indians in Missouri to find location...

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” to be built in Independence.2 Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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wrote, “The plot for the City and the size form and dime[n]sions of the house were given us of the Lord.”3 On 2 August, the revelation featured here called for a similar “laying out” of Kirtland as the “city of the stake of Zion” and specified the construction of two additional buildings—a “house” for the presidency and one for a printing operation—to be built in the city’s center.
Four days after JS dictated this revelation, the presidency copied it, along with two other recent revelations, into a letter they sent to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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.4 The revelation, the presidency stated, “is also binding on you that is you at Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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have to build two houses as well as the one of which we have sent the pattern.” In other words, they instructed that, following the construction of the House of the Lord

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

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in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, the Missouri church members should build an administrative house for church business and one for their printing establishment “as soon . . . as means can be obtaind so to do.”5 These plans, however, were disrupted by events that had already begun to unfold in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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. In late July 1833, unbeknownst to the presidency in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, opponents to the church had razed the church’s Independence printing office

JS revelations, dated 20 July and 1 Aug. 1831, directed establishment of LDS church’s first printing office in Independence, Missouri. Dedicated by Bishop Edward Partridge, 29 May 1832. Located on Lot 76, on Liberty Street just south of courthouse square....

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, threatened local leaders, and forced them to sign an agreement that they and their fellow religionists would leave Jackson County.6

A memorandum of agreement specified that certain men, mostly church leaders, were to remove their families by 1 January 1834. Leaders were to “use all their influence” to persuade about half of the church members in Jackson County to leave by that date and the remainder to leave by 1 April 1834. (Letter from John Whitmer, 29 July 1833; see also Memorandum of Agreement, 29 July 1833, CHL.)  


Amid escalating tension, violent encounters drove the Mormons from the county in November 1833.
Meanwhile, in the fall of 1833, members of the church in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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were having their own difficulties fulfilling the commandment

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

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to build a House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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. Construction in Kirtland temporarily halted because of a lack of building materials and the new priority to provide relief to church members in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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.7

See Ames, Autobiography, [10]; Johnson, Reminiscences and Journal, 17–18; and Johnson, "A Life Review,” 11.  


Completing the Kirtland House of the Lord consumed most of the church’s available resources for the next few years. After printing operations moved to Kirtland, they were first housed at the John Johnson

14 Apr. 1779–30 July 1843. Farmer, innkeeper. Born at Chesterfield, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Son of Israel Johnson and Abigail Higgins. Married Alice (Elsa) Jacobs, 22 June 1800. Moved to Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont, ca. 1803. Settled at Hiram, Portage...

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inn

Two-story building built by Peter French, 1827. First brick building in Kirtland. Common room had capacity for fifty people. Purchased by LDS church, 1833. John Johnson Sr. was granted license to keep tavern or inn there, 5 Apr. 1834. Also served as office...

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and later at the schoolhouse

Two-story structure measuring thirty by thirty-eight feet, built during fall and winter of 1834. Located immediately west of temple lot on Whitney Street (now Maple Street) in Kirtland. School of the Elders met here from winter 1834–1835 to Jan. 1836. Ground...

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. The two structures meant for the presidency and for printing were never built in either Kirtland or Jackson County.
In early published compilations of JS’s revelations, this 2 August revelation has been incorrectly dated to 6 May 1833. In the 6 August 1833 letter from the presidency of the high priesthood to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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church leaders, this revelation, though not specifically dated 2 August 1833, immediately follows, without any commentary or introduction, another revelation dated 2 August 1833. The letter indicated that the revelations were two separate texts by referring to them as “revelations,” in the plural.8 Several days later, when Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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wrote his own letter to church leaders in Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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, he was explicit: “Our brethren here have sent you three revelations concerning Zion two of them dated the second of Aug.”9 When this revelation was recorded in Revelation Book 2, it was given its own heading and again placed immediately after the other revelation that bears the date 2 August 1833. When it was later copied into Revelation Book 1, it was recorded as in the 6 August letter, without a separate introduction or date.10 Revelation Book 1 was used when creating the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, the first canonized volume in which this revelation appeared. The printers included an introduction to the revelation, which read, “Revelation given same date,” which probably referred to the same date as the revelation that preceded it in the manuscript revelation book—that is, 2 August 1833. However, when preparing the 1835 volume for printing, the compositor apparently mistakenly inserted the 6 May 1833 revelation between the first 2 August revelation and the one featured here.11

See Revelation, 2 Aug. 1833–A, in Doctrine and Covenants 81, 1835 ed. [D&C 97]; Revelation, 6 May 1833, in Doctrine and Covenants 82, 1835 ed. [D&C 93]; and Revelation, 2 Aug. 1833–B, in Doctrine and Covenants 83, 1835 ed. [D&C 94]; see also Revelation, 6 May 1833 [D&C 93]; and Revelation, 2 Aug. 1833–A [D&C 97].  


Thus, in the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants, the phrase “given the same date” in the revelation’s heading seems to refer to 6 May rather than 2 August 1833. The 1844 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants maintained the same heading as the 1835 edition. For the 1876 edition, a new heading was written and explicitly dates this revelation to 6 May 1833. This error was perpetuated in all subsequent editions of the Doctrine and Covenants until the 2013 edition published by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Several early copies of this revelation were made, one of which was included in the body of the aforementioned letter sent to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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on 6 August 1833 and one of which appears in Revelation Book 2.12 Insufficient evidence exists to determine which is the earliest extant copy. Because the 6 August letter, including the three revelations inscribed in it, is published in its entirety later in this volume, the version here is from the manuscript revelation book. Significant differences between the two versions are noted.

Facts