Doctrine and Covenants, 1835

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Lecture 1
THEOLOGY.
 
LECTURE FIRST
 
On the doctrine of the church of the
Latter Day Saints.
 
Of Faith.
 
SECTION I.
 
1 Faith being the first principle in revealed religion, and the foundation of all righteousness, necessarily claims the first place in a course of lectures which are designed to unfold to the understanding the doctrine of Jesus Christ.
2 In presenting the subject of faith, we shall observe the following order:
3 First, Faith itself—what it is:
4 Secondly, The object on which it rests; and
5 Thirdly, The effects which flow from it.
6 Agreeably to this order we have first to show what faith is.
7 The author of the epistle to the Hebrews, in the eleventh chapter of that epistle, and first verse, gives the following definition of the word faith:
8 Now faith is the substance -[assurance]- of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.
9 From this we learn, that faith is the assurance which men have of the existence of things which they have not seen; and the principle of action in all intelligent beings.
10 If men were duly to consider themselves, and turn their thoughts and reflections to the operations of [p. [5]]
Lecture 1
THEOLOGY.
 
LECTURE FIRST
 
On the doctrine of the church of the
Latter Day Saints.
 
Of Faith.
 
SECTION I.
 
1 Faith being the first principle in revealed religion, and the foundation of all righteousness, necessarily claims the first place in a course of lectures which are designed to unfold to the understanding the doctrine of Jesus Christ.
2 In presenting the subject of faith, we shall observe the following order:
3 First, Faith itself—what it is:
4 Secondly, The object on which it rests; and
5 Thirdly, The effects which flow from it.
6 Agreeably to this order we have first to show what faith is.
7 The author of the epistle to the Hebrews, in the eleventh chapter of that epistle, and first verse, gives the following definition of the word faith:
8 Now faith is the substance -[assurance]- of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.
9 From this we learn, that faith is the assurance which men have of the existence of things which they have not seen; and the principle of action in all intelligent beings.
10 If men were duly to consider themselves, and turn their thoughts and reflections to the operations of [p. [5]]
Page [5]