Letter from Lewis Cass, 9 December 1843

  • Source Note
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Dec. 9th ’43
Sir
I received not long since your letter of the 5th ult, in which after referring to the difficulties, which the people called Mormonites have experienced, you ask me, “what would be my rule of action toward them as a people should fortune favor my ascension to the Chief Magistracy.[”]
The contingency to which you refer is one which I have never sought, and never shall seek to attain, nor will the prospect of it whether near or remote, have the slightest influence upon my feelings or opinions. And without any affectation of humility, I may truly say that when I look to the able men whose names are now before the , in connexion with that high office, I cannot but think that the selection will fall upon one of them, rather than upon me.
Still ordinary civility requires that I should answer you, and I do so with the less hesitation as your question involves neither doubt nor difficulty. I think then that the Mormonites should be treated as [p. [1]]
Dec. 9th ’43
Sir
I received not long since your letter of the 5th ult, in which after referring to the difficulties, which the people called Mormonites have experienced, you ask me, “what would be my rule of action toward them as a people should fortune favor my ascension to the Chief Magistracy.”
The contingency to which you refer is one which I have never sought, and never shall seek to attain, nor will the prospect of it whether near or remote, have the slightest influence upon my feelings or opinions. And without any affectation of humility, I may truly say that when I look to the able men whose names are now before the , in connexion with that high office, I cannot but think that the selection will fall upon one of them, rather than upon me.
Still ordinary civility requires that I should answer you, and I do so with the less hesitation as your question involves neither doubt nor difficulty. I think then that the Mormonites should be treated as [p. [1]]
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