Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 November 1833

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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November 6, 1833.
Dear brethren,—Since I last wrote we have had horrible times. When  I from—— behold the enemy had suddenly come upon our breth ren above , and had thrown down 10 or 12 houses, and nearly whipped  some to death, among whom was .— This was done on Thursday  night.— On Tuesday night they commenced in ; broke all the  windows of the brethren’s houses in; broke open the doors of ’s  , strewed the goods in the streets. Saturday night they fell upon the  brethren at the —nearly beat one to death! but one of Manship’s sons  was dangerously wounded with a rifle ball, they fled. On Monday about sun  set, a regular action was fought above ; we had 4 wounded—They  had 5 wounded and killed; among the latter were and Mr.  Linville. From Friday till Tuesday after noon our brethren were under  arms. On Tuesday the mob had about three hundred collected—Before  any blood was shed we agreed to go away immediately.
It is a horrid time, men, women and children are fleeing, or preparing to,  in all directions, almost—We mean to try to settle in Van Buren county if  possible, God only knows our lot.
Yours &c.
November 7, 1833.
Since I wrote yesterday morning, another horrid scene has transpired.—  After our people agreed to leave the and were dispersed from each  other in a measure, a party of the mob went to the , and began to whip,  and, as I heard late last night, murder!
All hopes of going to the south was given up last night, when it was re solved that we forthwith into . The brethren  have been driven into the woods, and God only knows what will become  of them. Women and children are flocking to ’s and . Our families will have to take the ground for a floor to-night if  they get down in season to cross the . Yours in affliction, &c. [p. 119]
November 6, 1833.
Dear brethren,—Since I last wrote we have had horrible times. When I from—— behold the enemy had suddenly come upon our brethren above , and had thrown down 10 or 12 houses, and nearly whipped some to death, among whom was .— This was done on Thursday night.— On Tuesday night they commenced in ; broke all the windows of the brethren’s houses in; broke open the doors of ’s , strewed the goods in the streets. Saturday night they fell upon the brethren at the —nearly beat one to death! but one of Manship’s sons was dangerously wounded with a rifle ball, they fled. On Monday about sun set, a regular action was fought above ; we had 4 wounded—They had 5 wounded and killed; among the latter were and Mr. Linville. From Friday till Tuesday after noon our brethren were under arms. On Tuesday the mob had about three hundred collected—Before any blood was shed we agreed to go away immediately.
It is a horrid time, men, women and children are fleeing, or preparing to, in all directions, almost—We mean to try to settle in Van Buren county if possible, God only knows our lot.
Yours &c.
November 7, 1833.
Since I wrote yesterday morning, another horrid scene has transpired.— After our people agreed to leave the and were dispersed from each other in a measure, a party of the mob went to the , and began to whip, and, as I heard late last night, murder!
All hopes of going to the south was given up last night, when it was resolved that we forthwith into . The brethren have been driven into the woods, and God only knows what will become of them. Women and children are flocking to ’s and . Our families will have to take the ground for a floor to-night if they get down in season to cross the . Yours in affliction, &c. [p. 119]
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