“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Installment 2, January 1840

Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Jan. 1840, 1:33–36. This is the second installment of the series. The first three installments were based on a manuscript in the hand of .

A HISTORY, OF THE PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LATTER DAY SAINTS IN .
 
continued.
 
Saturday, Nov. 2d [1833], it was concluded to try again for a peace warrant: accordingly application was made to a magistrate by the name of Silvers, who resided some distance from town, and who had not as yet openly joined the mob, but he refused to grant a warrant, saying that if he did he feared that his life would be in dander [danger].— The next day four men were started to the , forty miles distance, after considerable delay by the judge, they obtained warrants against a number of individuals. When the warrants arrived, it was too late to do any thing with them, for the whole was getting up in arms, and the saints had as much as they could do to take care of themselves. But to return—Saturday night came on, and a party of the mob went to a settlement, of the saints living on about six miles west of town; they first tore the roof from a house, and injured the furniture within; they then divided their company into two parties, one went to pulling the roof from another dwelling house, whilst the other party went to another and broke it open; they found the owner D[avid] Bennett in bed, whom they took and beat unmercifully; one of the company drew a pistol, and swore that he would blow out his brains, but the ball laid bare his skull without fracturing it—thus narrowly he escaped with his life. A party of the saints were collected near by, who hearing the disturbance went to the place. The mob began to fire upon them, and they returned the compliment, a few guns were discharged from both parties, but the fire was not general; at length a young man of the mob was shot in the thigh, and soon after the mob dispersed for that night.
Sunday, Nov. 3d. Many threatnings were heard from the mobbers; they were greatly enraged, and were exerting themselves to strengthen their party; for as yet some of the inhabitants manifested friendship for the brethren; such told them, that they expected, they would all be massacreed, for the enemy were about to get a six pounder, and come out openly against them the next day.
Monday, Nov. 4th. A large mob collected at ’s store, about a mile west of , they came to the took the ferry boat, and threatened some lives; but for some unknown cause, perhaps to take some more whiskey, they left the and returned to ’s store again.— Whilst they were at the threatening the saints, word was sent to a body of the brethren, about five or six miles distant to the southwest, that a large mob was collected, and they expected that they should need help; whereupon, nineteen brethren started to go and assist them, but before they reached ’s store, they learned that the mob had returned there, upon hearing this, they proceeded no farther, but returned back. The mob, by some means feared that they were on the road west of them; when from fifty to seventy of the mob took their rifles, mounted their horses, and went in pursuit of them: after travelling about two miles they came in sight of them, when they all fled into the cornfields and woods; some went immediately to the body, and informed their brethren, of what they had seen. About thirty of the saints, (mostly those who had lived in the settlement, where the mob then was, some of whom had had their houses unroofed, but a short time before,) took their arms, and started as soon as possible, to meet the mob.— Meantime the mob turned their horses into cornfields, of the saints, and then hunted for them who had fled; they went to s a lame brother, who had not left his home, and pointed their guns at him, and threatened his life, provided he did not tell them [p. 33]
Installment 2, January 1840

Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, Jan. 1840, 1:33–36. This is the second installment of the series. The first three installments were based on a manuscript in the hand of .

A HISTORY, OF THE PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LATTER DAY SAINTS IN .
 
continued.
 
Saturday, Nov. 2d 1833, it was concluded to try again for a peace warrant: accordingly application was made to a magistrate by the name of Silvers, who resided some distance from town, and who had not as yet openly joined the mob, but he refused to grant a warrant, saying that if he did he feared that his life would be in dander danger.— The next day four men were started to the , forty miles distance, after considerable delay by the judge, they obtained warrants against a number of individuals. When the warrants arrived, it was too late to do any thing with them, for the whole was getting up in arms, and the saints had as much as they could do to take care of themselves. But to return—Saturday night came on, and a party of the mob went to a settlement, of the saints living on about six miles west of town; they first tore the roof from a house, and injured the furniture within; they then divided their company into two parties, one went to pulling the roof from another dwelling house, whilst the other party went to another and broke it open; they found the owner David Bennett in bed, whom they took and beat unmercifully; one of the company drew a pistol, and swore that he would blow out his brains, but the ball laid bare his skull without fracturing it—thus narrowly he escaped with his life. A party of the saints were collected near by, who hearing the disturbance went to the place. The mob began to fire upon them, and they returned the compliment, a few guns were discharged from both parties, but the fire was not general; at length a young man of the mob was shot in the thigh, and soon after the mob dispersed for that night.
Sunday, Nov. 3d. Many threatnings were heard from the mobbers; they were greatly enraged, and were exerting themselves to strengthen their party; for as yet some of the inhabitants manifested friendship for the brethren; such told them, that they expected, they would all be massacreed, for the enemy were about to get a six pounder, and come out openly against them the next day.
Monday, Nov. 4th. A large mob collected at ’s store, about a mile west of , they came to the took the ferry boat, and threatened some lives; but for some unknown cause, perhaps to take some more whiskey, they left the and returned to ’s store again.— Whilst they were at the threatening the saints, word was sent to a body of the brethren, about five or six miles distant to the southwest, that a large mob was collected, and they expected that they should need help; whereupon, nineteen brethren started to go and assist them, but before they reached ’s store, they learned that the mob had returned there, upon hearing this, they proceeded no farther, but returned back. The mob, by some means feared that they were on the road west of them; when from fifty to seventy of the mob took their rifles, mounted their horses, and went in pursuit of them: after travelling about two miles they came in sight of them, when they all fled into the cornfields and woods; some went immediately to the body, and informed their brethren, of what they had seen. About thirty of the saints, (mostly those who had lived in the settlement, where the mob then was, some of whom had had their houses unroofed, but a short time before,) took their arms, and started as soon as possible, to meet the mob.— Meantime the mob turned their horses into cornfields, of the saints, and then hunted for them who had fled; they went to s a lame brother, who had not left his home, and pointed their guns at him, and threatened his life, provided he did not tell them [p. 33]
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