Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [8], bk. 6
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she answered in the affirmative but went home in  anger determined to have satisfaction in some way  for the slight which she had received
When a short space of time had elapsed returned but his s anger kindled afresh  at her s presence so much so that she prep ared a bed and room for him alone which she ref used to enter— A young man had been adre  paying his addresses to Lucy Har[r]is s oldest  daughter of this by the name of Dikes <of> this young  Gentlemen the of <the> Girl was very fond and  the young Lady was not at all averse to him  but of course was decidedly upon the  negative. But just at this juncture a scheme enter ed her brain that changed her deportment to Mr  Dikes very materially— She told Mr Dikes that if  he would contrive to get the egyptian characters out  of s possession of and hire a room in &  take transcribe them accurately and bring her the tra nscripts that she would give him her daug[h]ter Lucy to  wife Mr Dikes readily agreed to this and sufice it to  say he succeeded to the ’s satisfaction and  received the promised reward. When began  again to prepare to set out for again in order to  set himself about the writing of the translation of the plates  His told <him> that she fully decreed in her heart to go also  He proposed to her that she should go with him  and stay a week or two on a visit and then he  would take her home and go again to do the  work of writing the Book She acceeded to this very  cheerfully— But her did suspect what he  was to encounter The first time he exhibited the  egyptian charecters She took out of her pocket an exact  copy of them and informed those present that Joe [p. [8], bk. 6]
she answered in the affirmative but went home in anger determined to have satisfaction in some way for the slight which she had received
When a short space of time had elapsed returned but his s anger kindled afresh at her s presence so much so that she prepared a bed and room for him alone which she refused to enter— A young man had been paying his addresses to Lucy Harris s oldest daughter by the name of Dikes of this young Gentlemen the of the Girl was very fond and the young Lady was not at all averse to him but of course was decidedly upon the negative. But just at this juncture a scheme entered her brain that changed her deportment to Mr Dikes very materially— She told Mr Dikes that if he would contrive to get the egyptian characters out of s possession and hire a room in & transcribe them accurately and bring her the transcript that she would give him her daughter Lucy to wife Mr Dikes readily agreed to this and sufice it to say he succeeded to the ’s satisfaction and received the promised reward. When began again to prepare to set out for in order to set himself about the writing of the translation of the plates His told him that she fully decreed in her heart to go also He proposed to her that she should go with him and stay a week or two on a visit and then he would take her home and go again to do the work of writing the Book She acceeded to this very cheerfully— But her did suspect what he was to encounter The first time he exhibited the egyptian charecters She took out of her pocket an exact copy of them and informed those present that Joe [p. [8], bk. 6]
Page [8], bk. 6