Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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army was on their march to , they passed  through . demanded the prisoners;  they were accordingly given up. He said he had the au thority of to do so. They were marched off with  the troops and set at liberty, after they had been con victed at a court of inquiry, and holden to bail for their  appearance, at the Circuit Court. Thus were the laws  of the land put at defiance, to save from punishment,  a mob[b]er and plunderer, and that, by the judge of the Cir cuit Court, who was bound by oath, to do otherwise.—  There were three persons arrested, the principal of which  was , the others were only hired in his ser vice.
This arrest took place on the 9th day of Sept. 1838,  on the first day of the week, and it was in the same week  that Generals , and , went with  their troops to . It was during the oper ation of this mob, the saints had a fair opportunity of  trying the honesty of the civil officers of .  An old gentleman from , by the name of Hoops, was  moving into . He had to pass through  Millport, the residence of the principal leaders of the   mob. , whose name has been  mentioned before, stopped his team forcibly in the road,  abused and insulted the family. Mr. Hoops, was an en tire stranger in the : he was detained a number of  hours before he could get away from them. The old  man went to a Justice of the Peace, and got a States  Warrant for him, gave it to an officer, and had it served on  him as they said, and had a day appointed for the trial.—  When the day came, was not there, but another  man was permitted to answer for him; and after the  witnesses were all sworn, and the facts of the unlawful  detention proven, the justice pronounced, no cause of  action. , in the meantime, had gone to Corrill [Carroll]  County, to join another mob, which had met, to drive out  a settlement of the saints which had settled in that Coun ty. The name of the justice was Covington. It was  found that in every County in upper , the law[s]  would not be put in force against the mob. The civil officers  would not regard their oaths, but in open violation of [p. 33]
army was on their march to , they passed through . demanded the prisoners; they were accordingly given up. He said he had the authority of to do so. They were marched off with the troops and set at liberty, after they had been convicted at a court of inquiry, and holden to bail for their appearance, at the Circuit Court. Thus were the laws of the land put at defiance, to save from punishment, a mobber and plunderer, and that, by the judge of the Circuit Court, who was bound by oath, to do otherwise.— There were three persons arrested, the principal of which was , the others were only hired in his service.
This arrest took place on the 9th day of Sept. 1838, on the first day of the week, and it was in the same week that Generals , and , went with their troops to . It was during the operation of this mob, the saints had a fair opportunity of trying the honesty of the civil officers of . An old gentleman from , by the name of Hoops, was moving into . He had to pass through Millport, the residence of the principal leaders of the mob. , whose name has been mentioned before, stopped his team forcibly in the road, abused and insulted the family. Mr. Hoops, was an entire stranger in the : he was detained a number of hours before he could get away from them. The old man went to a Justice of the Peace, and got a States Warrant for him, gave it to an officer, and had it served on him as they said, and had a day appointed for the trial.— When the day came, was not there, but another man was permitted to answer for him; and after the witnesses were all sworn, and the facts of the unlawful detention proven, the justice pronounced, no cause of action. , in the meantime, had gone to Corrill [Carroll] County, to join another mob, which had met, to drive out a settlement of the saints which had settled in that County. The name of the justice was Covington. It was found that in every County in upper , the laws would not be put in force against the mob. The civil officers would not regard their oaths, but in open violation of [p. 33]
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