Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 46
image
woods, about a mile from . Shortly before they reached their place of encampment, they passed by the house of a man by the name of Carey; he was a stranger in the country. One of the army, or rather mob, for such, they truly were, walked up to him, and beat his brains out with his gun. They took him up, and threw him into a wagon, and took him off with them, and refused to let his family see him, or administer to him. After keeping him for a length of time, they finally let his family have him. He expired shortly after.
This cool blooded murder, was passed by, as a matter of no consequence; though it was known to all the officers. The man who committed the murder, was by the name of Donihue.
Who they were, or what they were after, no one knew. It was rumored that such an army had crossed the line; and the authorities sent out men, to enquire who they were; and what they were after; but no information could be obtained, until the army arrived. Shortly after their arrival, a man by the name of Pomeroy, came to the town bearing a white flag; and said he wanted three persons out of the town, before it was massacred, and the rest would all be put to the sword.
The persons they called for, refused to go, saying that if their friends had to be slaughtered, they would die with them. The messenger shed a few crockadile tears, and went back to their camp.
Shortly after he returned, behold! here comes , with his brigade; marching towards the town, in line of battle. To this brigade, was presented a line also, in battle order, consisting of two hundred and fifty persons. The gazed upon them, and thought best to order a halt. He paused and looked, and then ordered a retreat, and went back to the camp.
During these maneuvres, of ’ army, for such the army proved to be, , with his banditti of painted plunderers, was prowling around the plundering all things that they could get their hands on, and carrying them off.
After the before-mentioned maneuvering, sent word to the town that there should not be any [p. 46]
woods, about a mile from . Shortly before they reached their place of encampment, they passed by the house of a man by the name of Carey; he was a stranger in the country. One of the army, or rather mob, for such, they truly were, walked up to him, and beat his brains out with his gun. They took him up, and threw him into a wagon, and took him off with them, and refused to let his family see him, or administer to him. After keeping him for a length of time, they finally let his family have him. He expired shortly after.
This cool blooded murder, was passed by, as a matter of no consequence; though it was known to all the officers. The man who committed the murder, was by the name of Donihue.
Who they were, or what they were after, no one knew. It was rumored that such an army had crossed the line; and the authorities sent out men, to enquire who they were; and what they were after; but no information could be obtained, until the army arrived. Shortly after their arrival, a man by the name of Pomeroy, came to the town bearing a white flag; and said he wanted three persons out of the town, before it was massacred, and the rest would all be put to the sword.
The persons they called for, refused to go, saying that if their friends had to be slaughtered, they would die with them. The messenger shed a few crockadile tears, and went back to their camp.
Shortly after he returned, behold! here comes , with his brigade; marching towards the town, in line of battle. To this brigade, was presented a line also, in battle order, consisting of two hundred and fifty persons. The gazed upon them, and thought best to order a halt. He paused and looked, and then ordered a retreat, and went back to the camp.
During these maneuvres, of ’ army, for such the army proved to be, , with his banditti of painted plunderers, was prowling around the plundering all things that they could get their hands on, and carrying them off.
After the before-mentioned maneuvering, sent word to the town that there should not be any [p. 46]
Page 46