Times and Seasons, 1 June 1842

  • Source Note
Page 807
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conduct of the editors of the Telegraph,) that nine-tenths of his time was taken up in a tirade against Mormonism, as nine-tenths of their remarks on that subject are—it would seem that so conclusive were his arguments in refuting the charges preferred by the editor of the States Register, that it was not necessary for the editor to mention them; while Mormonism, that awful delusion: that growing evil; that monstrous iniquity, must be put down;—leaving then the above named papers to settle their difficulty; we shall notice his remarks on the Mormons.
What does mean when speaking of the Mormons, that they are different from other people, and that they have some special law given them to be governed by; or has he made use of those expressions to decoy the unwary and gull the ignorant for political effect? There is no excuse for what he has done, he has done it knowingly, wantonly, wilfully, and wickedly.
knows that the law knows no difference between Mormon citizens and other citizens, and that there is no law in the , or in this to prevent people from worshiping the Almighty God according to the dictates of their conscience;” that under the broad flag of American liberty the Methodists, Presbyterians, Catholics, Universalists, Friends, or Latter Day Saints, are all one; their religion is unknown they are all citizens of this great republic, and are governed by the same law; and that they all possess equal privileges without distinction: then why should he try to make that appear to exist which never was in being?
As citizens of we would ask, what greater privileges do we possess than the inhabitants of other cities? we have a city charter, so have other cities; such as , , , , and ; we have a charter for a Legion; this may differ some little in form from some of the proceedings of other cities but certainly is not unconstitutional, it is in strict conformity with the laws of this , and of the . The Legion is decidedly the best organised, and most efficient military force in the State of , or in the western country; it is well disciplined and officered with the best talent the country affords.—If this is a sin we plead guilty, but we could heartily wish that our neighbors would imitate our example, then should we have a more efficient force to defend our country. Are these privileges that are denied other citizens? this “privileged sect”—(don‘t name it call them citizens sir,) have no other privileges than the citizens of other cities.
Will , or the “editor of the “Telegraph and Review, show us what privileges we enjoy over other citizens, or other denominations? will he be so kind as to point out some of those “anti-republcan extraordinary” and “arbitrary powers.” that the Mormons possess.
Will the please tell us where that ordinance can be found referred to by him: when it passed, &c.? The palpable falsehoods that he has uttered; and the gross misrepresentations that he has made use of, remind us of the words of one of the ancients, “their heart is full of cursing and bitterness, the poison of asps is under their tongues, and the way of peace they have not known.” We have no such exclusive ordinance as the one referred to by ; his statements are palpably false; we have no less than three gentlemen in our city council who are not members of our church at all. But we have laws for the suppression of vice: for taking up vagrants or disorderly persons; for defamation of characterr, &c.; and if in our city a Methodist, Presbyterian, Baptist, Latter Day Saint, or was found transgressing these laws, they would be judged by the laws, and not by their religion.
This blending of religious with civil affairs, is merely to deceive mankind; as citizens of this republic we have the priviledge of using such priviledges as other men, and of voting for whom we please. If it is our religion that he wishes to contend with, let him bring his bible, and we will meet him on that ground; but we think that our city charter, political intrigue, and city ordinances, make a curious compound when mixed up with religion.
We suppose that the following is the ordinance referred to by the , let him read it and blush, (vol. 2, page 336, Times and Seasons.
An Ordinance in relation to religious societies.
Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of . That the Catholics, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, Latter-Day-Saints, Quakers, Episcopalians, Universalists, Unitarians, Mohamedans, and all other religious sects, and denominations, whatever, shall have toleration, and equal priviledges in this , and should any person be guilty of ridiculing, abusing, or otherwise depreciating another, in consequence of his religion, or of disturbing, or interrupting, any religious meeting, within the limits [p. 807]
conduct of the editors of the Telegraph,) that nine-tenths of his time was taken up in a tirade against Mormonism, as nine-tenths of their remarks on that subject are—it would seem that so conclusive were his arguments in refuting the charges preferred by the editor of the States Register, that it was not necessary for the editor to mention them; while Mormonism, that awful delusion: that growing evil; that monstrous iniquity, must be put down;—leaving then the above named papers to settle their difficulty; we shall notice his remarks on the Mormons.
What does mean when speaking of the Mormons, that they are different from other people, and that they have some special law given them to be governed by; or has he made use of those expressions to decoy the unwary and gull the ignorant for political effect? There is no excuse for what he has done, he has done it knowingly, wantonly, wilfully, and wickedly.
knows that the law knows no difference between Mormon citizens and other citizens, and that there is no law in the , or in this to prevent people from worshiping the Almighty God according to the dictates of their conscience;” that under the broad flag of American liberty the Methodists, Presbyterians, Catholics, Universalists, Friends, or Latter Day Saints, are all one; their religion is unknown they are all citizens of this great republic, and are governed by the same law; and that they all possess equal privileges without distinction: then why should he try to make that appear to exist which never was in being?
As citizens of we would ask, what greater privileges do we possess than the inhabitants of other cities? we have a city charter, so have other cities; such as , , , , and ; we have a charter for a Legion; this may differ some little in form from some of the proceedings of other cities but certainly is not unconstitutional, it is in strict conformity with the laws of this , and of the . The Legion is decidedly the best organised, and most efficient military force in the State of , or in the western country; it is well disciplined and officered with the best talent the country affords.—If this is a sin we plead guilty, but we could heartily wish that our neighbors would imitate our example, then should we have a more efficient force to defend our country. Are these privileges that are denied other citizens? this “privileged sect”—(don‘t name it call them citizens sir,) have no other privileges than the citizens of other cities.
Will , or the “editor of the “Telegraph and Review, show us what privileges we enjoy over other citizens, or other denominations? will he be so kind as to point out some of those “anti-republcan extraordinary” and “arbitrary powers.” that the Mormons possess.
Will the please tell us where that ordinance can be found referred to by him: when it passed, &c.? The palpable falsehoods that he has uttered; and the gross misrepresentations that he has made use of, remind us of the words of one of the ancients, “their heart is full of cursing and bitterness, the poison of asps is under their tongues, and the way of peace they have not known.” We have no such exclusive ordinance as the one referred to by ; his statements are palpably false; we have no less than three gentlemen in our city council who are not members of our church at all. But we have laws for the suppression of vice: for taking up vagrants or disorderly persons; for defamation of characterr, &c.; and if in our city a Methodist, Presbyterian, Baptist, Latter Day Saint, or was found transgressing these laws, they would be judged by the laws, and not by their religion.
This blending of religious with civil affairs, is merely to deceive mankind; as citizens of this republic we have the priviledge of using such priviledges as other men, and of voting for whom we please. If it is our religion that he wishes to contend with, let him bring his bible, and we will meet him on that ground; but we think that our city charter, political intrigue, and city ordinances, make a curious compound when mixed up with religion.
We suppose that the following is the ordinance referred to by the , let him read it and blush, (vol. 2, page 336, Times and Seasons.
An Ordinance in relation to religious societies.
Sec. 1. Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of . That the Catholics, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, Latter-Day-Saints, Quakers, Episcopalians, Universalists, Unitarians, Mohamedans, and all other religious sects, and denominations, whatever, shall have toleration, and equal priviledges in this , and should any person be guilty of ridiculing, abusing, or otherwise depreciating another, in consequence of his religion, or of disturbing, or interrupting, any religious meeting, within the limits [p. 807]
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