30486

Letter to Vienna Jaques, 4 September 1833

let thy saints come unto Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
out of every nation12

See Isaiah 2:2–3; and Revelation, ca. 7 Mar. 1831 [D&C 45:69].  


let her be exalted to the third heavens13

See 2 Corinthians 12:2.  


and let thy Judgments be sent forth unto victory14

See Matthew 12:20; and Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:11].  


and after this great tribulation let thy blessings fall upon thy people15

See Revelation, 1 Aug. 1831 [D&C 58:3–4]. JS referred to this passage in the 1 August 1831 revelation again several months later when attempting to comfort the church leaders in Missouri. He reminded them of “a certain clause in one [revelation] which says that after much tribulation cometh the blessing.” (Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 10 Dec. 1833, underlining in original.)  


and let thy handmaid live till her soul shall be satisfied in beholding the glory of Zion notwithstanding her present affliction16

That is, Zion’s present affliction. The phrases “great tribulation” and “present affliction” may have been used to describe the general conditions in Missouri or perhaps were used in response to Jaques’s earlier letter, which may have described the violent encounters she witnessed in Missouri in July. (See Vienna Jaques, Statement, 22 Feb. 1859, CHL.)  


she shall yet arise and put on her beautiful garments17

See Isaiah 52:1.  


and be the Joy and glory of the whole earth18

See Psalm 48:2.  


therefore let your heart be comferted19

See Colossians 2:2.  


live in strict obedience to the commandments

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

View Glossary
of God20

JS later wrote to Edward Partridge, “We know not what we shall be called to pass through before Zion is delivered and established therefore we have great need to live near to God and always be in strict obedience to all his commandments that we may have a concience void of offense towards God and man.” (Letter to Edward Partridge, 5 Dec. 1833.)  


and walk humble before him and he will exalt thee in his own due time21

See 1 Peter 5:6.  


the brethren in this place are gaining ground in spiritual things and are trying to overcome all things that is not well pleasing to their heavenly father22

See Revelation, 9 May 1831 [D&C 50:35].  


there has many brethren mooved to this place from different parts of the country so much so that one house is not sufficient to contain them for public worship and we have divided and hold meetings in two sepperete places23

Earlier that summer, the presidency of the high priesthood reported that “the number of disciples in K[irtland] is, about 150.” (Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 25 June 1833.)  


namely at the school house on the flats

Also referred to as “little red schoolhouse.” First frame schoolhouse in township. Built on Kirtland “flats” (lowlands on northern side of community just southwest of Kirtland-Chardon Road), 1819. Served as school for community and location of youth Sunday...

More Info
and Uncle John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
s who lives on brother Joseph Coe

12 Nov. 1784–17 Oct. 1854. Farmer, clerk. Born at Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Joel Coe and Huldah Horton. Lived at Scipio, Cayuga Co., by 1800. Married first Pallas Wales, 12 Jan. 1816. Married second Sophia Harwood, ca. 1824. Moved to Macedon, Wayne Co....

View Full Bio
s place24

The schoolhouse on the flats was located in the central part of Kirtland on the road east of Newel K. Whitney’s store and the tannery. It is unclear where John Smith lived. When he moved to Kirtland in May 1833, he wrote in his journal that he “hired a house & moved into it,” but he did not specify the location. Though Joseph Coe had purchased the Peter French farm on behalf of the Church of Christ in April, he apparently did not live on that land. “Brother Coes place” likely refers to his fifty-three-acre property located on lot 6, which was about a half mile northeast from central Kirtland. (“Portion of Kirtland Township, Ohio, 31 December 1833;” John Smith, Journal, 25 May 1833; see also Historical Introduction to Minutes, 23 Mar. 1833–A; Geauga Co., OH, Deed Records, 1795–1921, vol. 16, pp. 176–177, 2 May 1832, microfilm 20,236, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; and illustration of church landholdings in Kirtland.)  


we have commenced building the house of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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in this place and are making great progress in it so much so that I feel great hopes that by spring it will be finished25

It actually took two more years beyond the following spring to complete the House of the Lord. Shortly after JS wrote this letter, construction on the House of the Lord in Kirtland, which had continued apace since its commencement in early June 1833, came to a halt. On 10 October 1833, Frederick G. Williams wrote, “We held a council this morning on the subject of building &c. it was decided by the council that we should discontinue the building of the temple for the winter for want of materials and to prepare and get all things ready to recommence it early in the spring.” By the following spring, however, most of the available men instead traveled to Missouri in the Camp of Israel to aid the dispossessed church members in Jackson County. (Frederick G. Williams, Kirtland, OH, to “Dear Brethren,” 10 Oct. 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 57–58.)  


so that we can have a place to worship where we shall not be molested a few days since Brother Ball and Sister Elizabeth Eaton Chase

1 Oct. 1779–1 Nov. 1854. Born in Newburyport, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Stephen Eaton and Sarah. Married William Chase, 26 Feb. 1798, in Newburyport. Resided at Newbury, Essex Co., by 1810. Husband died, between 1818 and 1826. Moved to Boston,...

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arived here from boston

Capital city located on eastern seaboard of Massachusetts at mouth of Charles River. Founded by English Puritans, 1630; received city charter, 1822. Population in 1820 about 43,000; in 1830 about 61,000; and in 1840 about 93,000. JS’s ancestor Robert Smith...

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brother ball has gone about three miles from this place to work at his trade and Sister Elizabeth

1 Oct. 1779–1 Nov. 1854. Born in Newburyport, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Stephen Eaton and Sarah. Married William Chase, 26 Feb. 1798, in Newburyport. Resided at Newbury, Essex Co., by 1810. Husband died, between 1818 and 1826. Moved to Boston,...

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lives with me at present26

“Brothe[r] Ball” may be Joseph Ball from the Boston area. By 1840, Ball was back in Boston, where he began a missionary tour through Massachusetts and Connecticut. Elizabeth Chase was baptized into the Church of Christ in Boston by Samuel Smith on 5 December 1832. (“Communications,” Times and Seasons, 15 Dec. 1840, 2:253–254; Samuel Smith, Diary, 5 Dec. 1832.)  


Agnes Coolbrith

11 July 1811–26 Dec. 1876. Born at Scarborough, Cumberland Co., Maine. Daughter of Joseph Coolbrith and Mary Hasty Foss. Moved to Boston, by 1832. Baptized into LDS church, 1832, at Boston. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, summer 1833. Married Don Carlos...

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& Mary Bailey

20 Dec. 1808–25 Jan. 1841. Born at Bedford, Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Joshua Bailey and Hannah Boutwell. Baptized into LDS church by Samuel H. Smith, 26 June 1832, at Boston. Migrated from Boston to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Married...

View Full Bio
Lives with father Smith

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

View Full Bio
27

Agnes Coolbrith and Mary Bailey were baptized in Boston after being taught by Samuel Smith and Orson Hyde during the men’s 1832 mission in that area. According to Bailey’s obituary, she left Boston sometime in 1833: “in company with Miss Coolbrith, . . . she bid farewell to friends and connexions, and every thing most dear, and traveled the distance of one thousand miles to Kirtland, Ohio, with no human protector but the one above named, to associate with the saints, in obedience to the commands of God, and the instructions of the inspired Prophets and Apostles.” Lucy Mack Smith’s history notes that in June 1833, “Mary Baily and Agnes colby was then boarding with me they devoted their whole time to making and mending clothes for the brethren who worked on the house There was but one main spring to all our thoughts and that was building the Lords house.” Coolbrith and Bailey later married JS’s brothers Don Carlos Smith and Samuel Smith, respectively. (Samuel Smith, Diary, 26 June and 30 July 1832; Obituary for Mary Bailey Smith, Times and Seasons, 15 Feb. 1841, 2:324–225; Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 14, [3].)  


——
I will assure you that the Lord has respect unto the offering you made28

See Genesis 4:4–5.  


he is a God that changes not and and his word cannot fail29

See Malachi 3:6; 1 Kings 8:56; and Revelation, 11 Sept. 1831 [D&C 64:31]; see also Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 536, 582 [Mormon 9:9; Moroni 8:18].  


remember what he has said in the book of mormon respecting those who should assist in bringing this work forth30

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 31 [1 Nephi 13:37].  


we frequently have inteligenc from our elder

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
abroad that are proclaming the word that God is working with them for they have attained to great faith insomuch that signs do follow them that believe31

See Mark 16:17; and Revelation, 22–23 Sept. 1832 [D&C 84:64–73]; see also Letter to Noah C. Saxton, 4 Jan. 1833.  


[p. [2]]
let thy saints come unto Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
out of every nation12

See Isaiah 2:2–3; and Revelation, ca. 7 Mar. 1831 [D&C 45:69].  


 let her be exalted to the third heavens13

See 2 Corinthians 12:2.  


and let thy  Judgments be sent forth unto victory14

See Matthew 12:20; and Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:11].  


and after this great  tribulation let thy blessings fall upon thy people15

See Revelation, 1 Aug. 1831 [D&C 58:3–4]. JS referred to this passage in the 1 August 1831 revelation again several months later when attempting to comfort the church leaders in Missouri. He reminded them of “a certain clause in one [revelation] which says that after much tribulation cometh the blessing.” (Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 10 Dec. 1833, underlining in original.)  


 and let thy handmaid live till her soul shall be sat isfied in beholding the glory of Zion notwithstanding  her present affliction16

That is, Zion’s present affliction. The phrases “great tribulation” and “present affliction” may have been used to describe the general conditions in Missouri or perhaps were used in response to Jaques’s earlier letter, which may have described the violent encounters she witnessed in Missouri in July. (See Vienna Jaques, Statement, 22 Feb. 1859, CHL.)  


she shall yet arise and put  on her beautiful garments17

See Isaiah 52:1.  


and be the Joy and  praise <glory> of the whole earth18

See Psalm 48:2.  


therefore let your heart be  comferted19

See Colossians 2:2.  


live in strict obedience to the commandments

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

View Glossary
 of God20

JS later wrote to Edward Partridge, “We know not what we shall be called to pass through before Zion is delivered and established therefore we have great need to live near to God and always be in strict obedience to all his commandments that we may have a concience void of offense towards God and man.” (Letter to Edward Partridge, 5 Dec. 1833.)  


and walk humble before him and he will  exalt thee in his own due time21

See 1 Peter 5:6.  


the brethren in this place  are gaining ground in spiritual things and are trying  to overcome all things that is not well pleasing to  their heavenly father22

See Revelation, 9 May 1831 [D&C 50:35].  


we have common there has  many brethren mooved to this place from different  parts of the country so much so that one house is  not sufficient to contain them for public worship  and we have divided and hold meetings in  two sepperete places23

Earlier that summer, the presidency of the high priesthood reported that “the number of disciples in K[irtland] is, about 150.” (Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 25 June 1833.)  


namely at the school house  on the flats

Also referred to as “little red schoolhouse.” First frame schoolhouse in township. Built on Kirtland “flats” (lowlands on northern side of community just southwest of Kirtland-Chardon Road), 1819. Served as school for community and location of youth Sunday...

More Info
and Uncle John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
s who lives on  brother [Joseph] Coe

12 Nov. 1784–17 Oct. 1854. Farmer, clerk. Born at Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Joel Coe and Huldah Horton. Lived at Scipio, Cayuga Co., by 1800. Married first Pallas Wales, 12 Jan. 1816. Married second Sophia Harwood, ca. 1824. Moved to Macedon, Wayne Co....

View Full Bio
s place24

The schoolhouse on the flats was located in the central part of Kirtland on the road east of Newel K. Whitney’s store and the tannery. It is unclear where John Smith lived. When he moved to Kirtland in May 1833, he wrote in his journal that he “hired a house & moved into it,” but he did not specify the location. Though Joseph Coe had purchased the Peter French farm on behalf of the Church of Christ in April, he apparently did not live on that land. “Brother Coes place” likely refers to his fifty-three-acre property located on lot 6, which was about a half mile northeast from central Kirtland. (“Portion of Kirtland Township, Ohio, 31 December 1833;” John Smith, Journal, 25 May 1833; see also Historical Introduction to Minutes, 23 Mar. 1833–A; Geauga Co., OH, Deed Records, 1795–1921, vol. 16, pp. 176–177, 2 May 1832, microfilm 20,236, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; and illustration of church landholdings in Kirtland.)  


we have commenced building  the house of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
in this place and are  making great progress in it so much so that I feel  great hopes that by spring it will be finished25

It actually took two more years beyond the following spring to complete the House of the Lord. Shortly after JS wrote this letter, construction on the House of the Lord in Kirtland, which had continued apace since its commencement in early June 1833, came to a halt. On 10 October 1833, Frederick G. Williams wrote, “We held a council this morning on the subject of building &c. it was decided by the council that we should discontinue the building of the temple for the winter for want of materials and to prepare and get all things ready to recommence it early in the spring.” By the following spring, however, most of the available men instead traveled to Missouri in the Camp of Israel to aid the dispossessed church members in Jackson County. (Frederick G. Williams, Kirtland, OH, to “Dear Brethren,” 10 Oct. 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 57–58.)  


so  that we can have a place to worship where we  shall not be molested a few days since Brothe[r]  Ball and Siste[r] Elizabeth [Eaton] Chase

1 Oct. 1779–1 Nov. 1854. Born in Newburyport, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Stephen Eaton and Sarah. Married William Chase, 26 Feb. 1798, in Newburyport. Resided at Newbury, Essex Co., by 1810. Husband died, between 1818 and 1826. Moved to Boston,...

View Full Bio
arived here <from>  boston

Capital city located on eastern seaboard of Massachusetts at mouth of Charles River. Founded by English Puritans, 1630; received city charter, 1822. Population in 1820 about 43,000; in 1830 about 61,000; and in 1840 about 93,000. JS’s ancestor Robert Smith...

More Info
broth[er] ball has gone about three miles from  this place to work at his trade and Siste[r] Elizab eth

1 Oct. 1779–1 Nov. 1854. Born in Newburyport, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Stephen Eaton and Sarah. Married William Chase, 26 Feb. 1798, in Newburyport. Resided at Newbury, Essex Co., by 1810. Husband died, between 1818 and 1826. Moved to Boston,...

View Full Bio
lives with me at present26

“Brothe[r] Ball” may be Joseph Ball from the Boston area. By 1840, Ball was back in Boston, where he began a missionary tour through Massachusetts and Connecticut. Elizabeth Chase was baptized into the Church of Christ in Boston by Samuel Smith on 5 December 1832. (“Communications,” Times and Seasons, 15 Dec. 1840, 2:253–254; Samuel Smith, Diary, 5 Dec. 1832.)  


Agnes [Coolbrith]

11 July 1811–26 Dec. 1876. Born at Scarborough, Cumberland Co., Maine. Daughter of Joseph Coolbrith and Mary Hasty Foss. Moved to Boston, by 1832. Baptized into LDS church, 1832, at Boston. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, summer 1833. Married Don Carlos...

View Full Bio
& Mary [Bailey]

20 Dec. 1808–25 Jan. 1841. Born at Bedford, Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Joshua Bailey and Hannah Boutwell. Baptized into LDS church by Samuel H. Smith, 26 June 1832, at Boston. Migrated from Boston to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833. Married...

View Full Bio
 Lives with father Smith

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

View Full Bio
27

Agnes Coolbrith and Mary Bailey were baptized in Boston after being taught by Samuel Smith and Orson Hyde during the men’s 1832 mission in that area. According to Bailey’s obituary, she left Boston sometime in 1833: “in company with Miss Coolbrith, . . . she bid farewell to friends and connexions, and every thing most dear, and traveled the distance of one thousand miles to Kirtland, Ohio, with no human protector but the one above named, to associate with the saints, in obedience to the commands of God, and the instructions of the inspired Prophets and Apostles.” Lucy Mack Smith’s history notes that in June 1833, “Mary Baily and Agnes colby was then boarding with me they devoted their whole time to making and mending clothes for the brethren who worked on the house There was but one main spring to all our thoughts and that was building the Lords house.” Coolbrith and Bailey later married JS’s brothers Don Carlos Smith and Samuel Smith, respectively. (Samuel Smith, Diary, 26 June and 30 July 1832; Obituary for Mary Bailey Smith, Times and Seasons, 15 Feb. 1841, 2:324–225; Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 14, [3].)  


——
I will assure you that the Lord has respect unto the  offering you made28

See Genesis 4:4–5.  


he is a God that changes not and  and his word cannot fail29

See Malachi 3:6; 1 Kings 8:56; and Revelation, 11 Sept. 1831 [D&C 64:31]; see also Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 536, 582 [Mormon 9:9; Moroni 8:18].  


remember what he has  said in the book of mormon respecting those who  should assist in bringing this work forth30

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 31 [1 Nephi 13:37].  


we  frequently have inteligenc from our elder

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
abroad  that are proclaming the word that God is working  with them for they have attained to great faith  insomuch that signs do follow them that believe31

See Mark 16:17; and Revelation, 22–23 Sept. 1832 [D&C 84:64–73]; see also Letter to Noah C. Saxton, 4 Jan. 1833.  


[p. [2]]
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In 1831, Vienna Jaques

10 June 1787–7 Feb. 1884. Laundress, nurse. Born in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Henry Jaques and Lucinda Hughes. Lived in Boston, 1827–1830. Baptized into LDS church by E. Harris, 12 July 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833....

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, an unmarried woman in her forties, converted to the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
. In the early 1830s, Jaques resided in Boston

Capital city located on eastern seaboard of Massachusetts at mouth of Charles River. Founded by English Puritans, 1630; received city charter, 1822. Population in 1820 about 43,000; in 1830 about 61,000; and in 1840 about 93,000. JS’s ancestor Robert Smith...

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, where she, “by patient toil and strict economy, had accumlated considerable means for those times.” While in Boston, Jaques had affiliated with a Methodist Episcopal church, but when she heard of JS and of the Book of Mormon, she traveled to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, met JS, and was baptized

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

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.1

George Hamlin, “In Memoriam,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Mar. 1884, 12:152.  


She returned to Boston, and in the summer of 1832, she assisted Samuel Smith

13 Mar. 1808–30 July 1844. Farmer, logger, scribe, builder, tavern operator. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, by Mar. 1810; to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811...

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and Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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in raising a small branch of the Church of Christ in Boston and the surrounding area.2

According to one Boston area newspaper, “Mormonite preachers have recently visited this city, and made about 15 converts to their strange doctrines, who have been baptised and joined the Mormon church.” According to Orson Hyde’s and Samuel Smith’s journals, during that summer the two men also preached in areas surrounding Boston and once lodged at Jaques’s second home in Fox Point wharf, near Providence, Rhode Island. (See “Mormonism,” American Traveller [Boston], 28 Aug. 1832, [2]; Samuel Smith, Diary, 22 June–7 Aug. 1832; and Hyde, Journal, 25 June–7 Aug. 1832.)  


That same summer Jaques decided to collect her means and again travel to Kirtland to gather with the Mormons.3

George Hamlin, “In Memoriam,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Mar. 1884, 12:152.  


She arrived in Kirtland by November 1832 and remained there until the spring of 1833.4

A copy of the 1830 edition of the Book of Mormon that apparently belonged to Vienna Jaques is held at the Church History Library. On the first page of the book is inscribed the following: “The Writeing above is Joseph Smith’ own handwriteing which he wrote, the day he gave the book me Vienna Jaques on the 22d of November 1832.” This note, apparently written by Jaques, follows a notation written by JS: “Vienna Jaque[s] Book Novem 22d. 1832.” A letter JS wrote to Missouri in late November 1832 indicates that Jaques was in Kirtland by that time. (Letter to William W. Phelps, 27 Nov. 1832.)  


By 8 March 1833, the day a JS revelation directed Jaques

10 June 1787–7 Feb. 1884. Laundress, nurse. Born in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Henry Jaques and Lucinda Hughes. Lived in Boston, 1827–1830. Baptized into LDS church by E. Harris, 12 July 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833....

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to relocate to Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, Jaques had consecrated

The dedicating of money, lands, goods, or one’s own life for sacred purposes. Both the New Testament and Book of Mormon referred to some groups having “all things common” economically; the Book of Mormon also referred to individuals who consecrated or dedicated...

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a substantial sum of money to the church.5

Revelation, 8 Mar. 1833 [D&C 90:28–31].  


The precise amount of money that Jaques donated is uncertain. In the summer of 1832, an article published in the Boston

Capital city located on eastern seaboard of Massachusetts at mouth of Charles River. Founded by English Puritans, 1630; received city charter, 1822. Population in 1820 about 43,000; in 1830 about 61,000; and in 1840 about 93,000. JS’s ancestor Robert Smith...

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newspaper American Traveller stated that several members of the Church of Christ branch in Boston contemplated “going to the west” for the “promised land.” The article reported that two women had left and that they had taken with them all their wealth. These two women “had acquired by industry, one 1500 and the other 800 dollars, which they have given up to go into the general stock.” The article did not name these women, but one of them was likely Jaques, as she immigrated to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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in the summer or fall of 1832, around the same time the women in the article departed. No other contemporary accounts mention Jaques or the financial situation of women immigrating to Kirtland at this time.6

“Mormonism,” American Traveller (Boston), 28 Aug. 1832, [2]. Later histories stated the amount donated by Jaques was $1,400. However, neither the evidence cited in those histories nor extant contemporaneous evidence corroborates that figure. According to Edward Tullidge’s Women of Mormondom, published in 1877, Jaques “went to Kirtland in 1833, being a single lady and very wealthy. When she arrived in Kirtland she donated all of her property to the church.” It is not clear if Tullidge interviewed Jaques for this publication. One obituary for Jaques similarly states that she collected her “considerable means” and that “by her liberality rendered” much “pecuniary assistance to the Church in its infancy.” Another obituary simply stated, “She was well known and widely respected for her life-long integrity and many virtues of character.” (Tullidge, Women of Mormondom, 441; George Hamlin, “In Memoriam,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Mar. 1884, 12:152; “Vienna Jacques Dead,” Deseret News [Salt Lake City], 13 Feb. 1884, 49.)  


Whatever the amount, Jaques’s consecration came at a propitious time. Church leaders were in the midst of contracting to purchase several parcels of land in Kirtland and needed additional funds to carry out such agreements. Jaques’s contribution, as JS wrote in this letter, “proved a Savior of life as pertaining to [JS’s] pecunary concern.”
By 30 April 1833, Jaques

10 June 1787–7 Feb. 1884. Laundress, nurse. Born in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Henry Jaques and Lucinda Hughes. Lived in Boston, 1827–1830. Baptized into LDS church by E. Harris, 12 July 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833....

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had not yet left for Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, as she had been directed to do by the 8 March 1833 revelation. A conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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of high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

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convened that day and “decided that Sister Vean Jaqush [Vienna Jaques] should not immediately procede on her Journy to Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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but to wait untill William Hobert

Ca. 1813–Oct. 1833. Typographer. Directed to accompany recent LDS church convert Vienna Jaques from Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, to Jackson Co., Missouri, June 1833. Intended to work for The Evening and the Morning Star newspaper in Independence, Jackson Co...

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gets ready and go in company with him.” Jaques and Hobert probably left sometime before mid-May and arrived in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Missouri, by 7 June. Jaques experienced considerable hardship on the journey when Hobert “was afflicted with a delirium, which for a short time entirely deprived him of his natural intellect.”7

Revelation, 8 Mar. 1833 [D&C 90:28–30]; Minutes, 30 Apr. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 2 July 1833; “Obituary,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 117.  


What is more, in July, just weeks after Jaques arrived in Jackson County, anti-Mormon violence erupted as county residents intended to force members of the Church of Christ to leave their lands.8 Jaques was an eyewitness to the tarring and feathering of Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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and other violent actions in Jackson County later that month, including the razing of the church’s print shop

JS revelations, dated 20 July and 1 Aug. 1831, directed establishment of LDS church’s first printing office in Independence, Missouri. Dedicated by Bishop Edward Partridge, 29 May 1832. Located on Lot 76, on Liberty Street just south of courthouse square....

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. According to Jaques’s later statement, during the attack on the print shop, she was attempting to gather pages from the partially printed Book of Commandments that “were thrown into the streets” when a “mobber came a long and remarked to her, ‘Madam this is only a prelude to what you have to suffer.’”9

Vienna Jaques, Statement, 22 Feb. 1859, CHL; see also [Edward Partridge], “A History, of the Persecution,” Times and Seasons, Dec. 1839, 1:18.  


Jaques

10 June 1787–7 Feb. 1884. Laundress, nurse. Born in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Henry Jaques and Lucinda Hughes. Lived in Boston, 1827–1830. Baptized into LDS church by E. Harris, 12 July 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833....

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wrote to JS sometime after her arrival in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, but her letter, which included “a history of [her] Journey and [her] safe arival,” has not been located. JS stated that both Jaques’s earlier letter and his own spiritual promptings led him to write the letter featured here. In the letter, JS expressed his gratitude for her safe arrival in Independence, reflected on the contemporary plight and future destiny of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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, shared news of church growth and temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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construction in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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and reports of missionary success in the East, provided instructions for Bishop

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, Partridge functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

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Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, and gave comments about or intended for mutual acquaintances.10

JS earlier stated that letters to Missouri were meant to be available to all church members. (Letter to Edward Partridge, 2 May 1833.)  


This document is the earliest surviving letter that JS addressed specifically to a woman other than his own wife Emma Hale Smith. The letter was postmarked on 11 September 1833, and though no extant record mentions its reception, it would have likely arrived in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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in early October, just weeks before violence there resumed.

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