Letter from Heber C. Kimball, 9 July 1840

  • Source Note
Page 859
EPISTLE.
, England,)
July 9th, 1840)
Dear Brother Joseph,
I now embrace this opportunity of writing this epistle to you in order to give you a sketch of my travels since I left you, and of the progress of the work of God in this land, together with the signs of the times and of the conflicts which I and my brethren have endured during our journey to this land. You very well remember the time and situation in which we left our homes;— and I started together. We were both very sick and we likewise left our families very sick. Not being well able to travel brother Bently took us on our way fifteen miles to brother Duel’s [Osmyn Duell’s]. This was on the 18th of September, we tarried at brother Duel’s house overnight and next day he took us to . Another brother volunteered there, and the same day took us on our way as far as which is fifty miles from . When we arrived at in consequence of the fatigues of the journey I was taken with the chill fever again at the sisters Pitkin’s:— after being there one or two days, I then went to Doctor Staley’s and remained under the care of Sister Staley and her daughter until the 25th, my pain and afflictions were very severe. I received great kindness from them and also from the Sisters Pitkin; and I pray that the Lord may abundantly bless them, and administer comfort and blessings to them in every time of need; ’s health was very poor in deed; he was not able to sit up but a little while at a time. While we were at Brothers , , and overtook us, they being also considerably sick and very feeble. The saints at were kind and administered to our wants and assissted us on our journey. My sorrow was great on leaving as well as on leaving , to see so many of our brethren sick and dying in consequence of being driven and being exposed to hunger and cold.
We all left on the 25th, Brother took and as far as Brother ’s distance about 9 miles, Brothers , , and had a horse and wagon of their own to help them on their way. left us and predicted many things which should come to pass, left his blessing with us and bid us farewell. May God bless him and save him in [p. 859]
EPISTLE.
, England,)
July 9th, 1840)
Dear Brother Joseph,
I now embrace this opportunity of writing this epistle to you in order to give you a sketch of my travels since I left you, and of the progress of the work of God in this land, together with the signs of the times and of the conflicts which I and my brethren have endured during our journey to this land. You very well remember the time and situation in which we left our homes;— and I started together. We were both very sick and we likewise left our families very sick. Not being well able to travel brother Bently took us on our way fifteen miles to brother Duel’s [Osmyn Duell’s]. This was on the 18th of September, we tarried at brother Duel’s house overnight and next day he took us to . Another brother volunteered there, and the same day took us on our way as far as which is fifty miles from . When we arrived at in consequence of the fatigues of the journey I was taken with the chill fever again at the sisters Pitkin’s:— after being there one or two days, I then went to Doctor Staley’s and remained under the care of Sister Staley and her daughter until the 25th, my pain and afflictions were very severe. I received great kindness from them and also from the Sisters Pitkin; and I pray that the Lord may abundantly bless them, and administer comfort and blessings to them in every time of need; ’s health was very poor in deed; he was not able to sit up but a little while at a time. While we were at Brothers , , and overtook us, they being also considerably sick and very feeble. The saints at were kind and administered to our wants and assissted us on our journey. My sorrow was great on leaving as well as on leaving , to see so many of our brethren sick and dying in consequence of being driven and being exposed to hunger and cold.
We all left on the 25th, Brother took and as far as Brother ’s distance about 9 miles, Brothers , , and had a horse and wagon of their own to help them on their way. left us and predicted many things which should come to pass, left his blessing with us and bid us farewell. May God bless him and save him in [p. 859]
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