“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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church, they might stay and be pro tected there; and a number tried the  experiment with success; and it is be lieved that some few of them are living  there in peace, to this day.
We will return again to the night  of the battle. The mob sent their run ners over the , to stir up the feel ings of the people, by misrepresenting  the doings of the saints, so as to have  them all turn out, and exterminate them  at once. The people took their arms  and started for , as fast as  they possibly could, so that early the  next morning there were hundreds  there ready for war. pre tended to call out the militia, as he said  to quill [quell] the mob, and make peace be tween the parties; but the fact is he  put himself, or was put, some said by  , then lieutenant Gov., at  the head of the mob, for the purpose of  making a show of legality for what  they did.
We must now return again to the  evening after the battle, and bring up  an other item. The body of saints  near , learning in the  evening, that the brethren were shut  up in the jail, and as they supposed for  the purpose of being put to death, sent  word immediately to Br. ,  (who lived about six miles off,) of their  situation, and requested help. collected together a hundred or  more of the saints, who were but poor ly armed, some having no weapons,  but clubs, and in the morning marched  them on the road towards ,  expecting to stop at the camp of the  saints, near town; but hearing of the  release of the prisoners, and of the  agreement of the brethren to leave  the forthwith; and also that the  militia were called out at  to make peace, before he had reached  the brethren’s settlement, he turned  aside his men into the woods, conclud ing to disperse soon and go home.—  News flew to town, that with a  company of his brethren, were march ing towards that place; this so enrag ed , and his pretended mil itia, that he demanded that and  his company should give up their arms;  and also those men who were in the  battle the night before, should be given  up, to be tried for murder; saying that  if they would do those things, they  should be safely protected, whilst re moving out of the ; otherwise  there was no peace for them. They  reluctantly consented to these proposi tions, and were it not for fear of re sisting the authorities of the country,  they would sooner have shed their blood  in the defence of their rights, and the  liberty of their country, than to have  submitted to such oppression. Howev er the arms were given up, amounting  to fifty one guns, one sword and one  pistol. And a number of those who  were in the battle, gave themselves  up as prisoners. The saints then made  all possible exertions to leave the .  After detaining the prisoners a day  and a night, and pretending to try them  for murder; and also threatening and  brick batting them, took  them into a cornfield, so that their lives  would not be in danger, from his pre tended militia; and after taking a  watch from one of them for costs, he  being the constable, said to them  “clear.” promised to give  back the brethren’s arms, whenever  they left the , this he afterwards  refused to do; Whereupon the ’s order was twice obtained for them  but he would not obey it, neither  have they ever been paid for. The  saints concluded to move south, into  Van Buren county, which was con sented to by a number of the leading  men. But before night word was sent  to them that they might go north and  east, but south and west they must not  go, if they did, they would meet with  trouble.
Wednesday, Nov. 6, the arms having  been taken from the saints; the mob now  felt safe, and were no longer militia,  they formed themselves into companies,  and went forth on horse-back armed,  to harrass the saints, and take all the  arms they could find. Two of these  companies were headed by baptist  preachers. The Rev. ,  headed one of about seventy, the other  priest’s company, whose name is not  now recollected, contained from thirty  to forty. They went forth through  the different settlements of the saints,  threatening them with death, and dis truction if they were not off immediate ly. They broke open houses, and  plundered them, where they found them  shut, and the owners gone. As it hap [p. 35]
church, they might stay and be protected there; and a number tried the experiment with success; and it is believed that some few of them are living there in peace, to this day.
We will return again to the night of the battle. The mob sent their runners over the , to stir up the feelings of the people, by misrepresenting the doings of the saints, so as to have them all turn out, and exterminate them at once. The people took their arms and started for , as fast as they possibly could, so that early the next morning there were hundreds there ready for war. pretended to call out the militia, as he said to quill quell the mob, and make peace between the parties; but the fact is he put himself, or was put, some said by , then lieutenant Gov., at the head of the mob, for the purpose of making a show of legality for what they did.
We must now return again to the evening after the battle, and bring up an other item. The body of saints near , learning in the evening, that the brethren were shut up in the jail, and as they supposed for the purpose of being put to death, sent word immediately to Br. , (who lived about six miles off,) of their situation, and requested help. collected together a hundred or more of the saints, who were but poorly armed, some having no weapons, but clubs, and in the morning marched them on the road towards , expecting to stop at the camp of the saints, near town; but hearing of the release of the prisoners, and of the agreement of the brethren to leave the forthwith; and also that the militia were called out at to make peace, before he had reached the brethren’s settlement, he turned aside his men into the woods, concluding to disperse soon and go home.— News flew to town, that with a company of his brethren, were marching towards that place; this so enraged , and his pretended militia, that he demanded that and his company should give up their arms; and also those men who were in the battle the night before, should be given up, to be tried for murder; saying that if they would do those things, they should be safely protected, whilst removing out of the ; otherwise there was no peace for them. They reluctantly consented to these propositions, and were it not for fear of resisting the authorities of the country, they would sooner have shed their blood in the defence of their rights, and the liberty of their country, than to have submitted to such oppression. However the arms were given up, amounting to fifty one guns, one sword and one pistol. And a number of those who were in the battle, gave themselves up as prisoners. The saints then made all possible exertions to leave the . After detaining the prisoners a day and a night, and pretending to try them for murder; and also threatening and brick batting them, took them into a cornfield, so that their lives would not be in danger, from his pretended militia; and after taking a watch from one of them for costs, he being the constable, said to them “clear.” promised to give back the brethren’s arms, whenever they left the , this he afterwards refused to do; Whereupon the ’s order was twice obtained for them but he would not obey it, neither have they ever been paid for. The saints concluded to move south, into Van Buren county, which was consented to by a number of the leading men. But before night word was sent to them that they might go north and east, but south and west they must not go, if they did, they would meet with trouble.
Wednesday, Nov. 6, the arms having been taken from the saints; the mob now felt safe, and were no longer militia, they formed themselves into companies, and went forth on horse-back armed, to harrass the saints, and take all the arms they could find. Two of these companies were headed by baptist preachers. The Rev. , headed one of about seventy, the other priest’s company, whose name is not now recollected, contained from thirty to forty. They went forth through the different settlements of the saints, threatening them with death, and distruction if they were not off immediately. They broke open houses, and plundered them, where they found them shut, and the owners gone. As it hap [p. 35]
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