Doctrine and Covenants, 1844

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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lation to many subjects, I now resume the  subject of the baptism for the dead; as that  subject seems to occupy my mind, and press  itself upon my feelings the strongest, since I  have been pursued by my enemies.
2 I wrote a few words of revelation to you  concerning a recorder. I have had a few ad ditional views in relation to this matter, which  I now certify. That is, it was declared in my  former letter that there should be a recorder,  who should be eye-witness, and also to hear  with his ears, that he might make a record of  a truth before the Lord.
3 Now, in relation to this matter, it would  be very difficult for one recorder to be present  at all times, and to do all the business. To  obviate this difficulty, there can be a record er appointed in each ward of the city, who is  well qualified for taking accurate minutes;  and let him be very particular and precise in  taking the whole proceedings: certifying in  his record that he saw with his eyes, and  heard with his ears; giving the date, and  names, &c., and the history of the whole  transaction; naming also, some three individu als that are present, if there be any present,  who can at any time when called upon, certi fy to the same, that in the mouth of two or  three witnesses every word may be estab lished.
4 Then let there be a general recorder, to  whom these other records can be handed, be ing attended with certificates over their own  signatures; certifying that the record which [p. 421]
lation to many subjects, I now resume the subject of the baptism for the dead; as that subject seems to occupy my mind, and press itself upon my feelings the strongest, since I have been pursued by my enemies.
2 I wrote a few words of revelation to you concerning a recorder. I have had a few additional views in relation to this matter, which I now certify. That is, it was declared in my former letter that there should be a recorder, who should be eye-witness, and also to hear with his ears, that he might make a record of a truth before the Lord.
3 Now, in relation to this matter, it would be very difficult for one recorder to be present at all times, and to do all the business. To obviate this difficulty, there can be a recorder appointed in each ward of the city, who is well qualified for taking accurate minutes; and let him be very particular and precise in taking the whole proceedings: certifying in his record that he saw with his eyes, and heard with his ears; giving the date, and names, &c., and the history of the whole transaction; naming also, some three individuals that are present, if there be any present, who can at any time when called upon, certify to the same, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established.
4 Then let there be a general recorder, to whom these other records can be handed, being attended with certificates over their own signatures; certifying that the record which [p. 421]
Page 421