Doctrine and Covenants, 1844

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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tice should be sought for and upheld by the  voice of the people, (if a republic,) or the will  of the sovereign.
4 We believe that religion is instituted of  God, and that men are amenable to him and  to him only for the exercise of it, unless their  religious opinion prompts them to infringe up on the rights and liberties of others; but we  do not believe that human law has a right to  interfere in prescribing rules of worship to  bind the consciences of men, nor dictate  forms for public or private devotion; that the  civil magistrate should restrain crime, but  never control conscience; should punish  guilt, but never suppress the freedom of the  soul.
5 We believe that all men are bound to  sustain and uphold the respective govern ments in which they reside, while protected  in their inherent and inalienable rights by the  laws of such governments, and that sedition  and rebellion are unbecoming every citizen  thus protected, and should be punished ac ccordingly; and that all governments have a  right to enact such laws as in their own judg ments are best calculated to secure the public  interest, at the same time, however, holding  sacred the freedom of conscience.
6 We believe that every man should be  honored in his station: rulers and magistrates  as such—being placed for the protection of  the innocent and the punishment of the guil ty; and that to the laws all men owe respect  and deference, as without them peace and har mony would be supplanted by anarchy and [p. 441]
tice should be sought for and upheld by the voice of the people, (if a republic,) or the will of the sovereign.
4 We believe that religion is instituted of God, and that men are amenable to him and to him only for the exercise of it, unless their religious opinion prompts them to infringe upon the rights and liberties of others; but we do not believe that human law has a right to interfere in prescribing rules of worship to bind the consciences of men, nor dictate forms for public or private devotion; that the civil magistrate should restrain crime, but never control conscience; should punish guilt, but never suppress the freedom of the soul.
5 We believe that all men are bound to sustain and uphold the respective governments in which they reside, while protected in their inherent and inalienable rights by the laws of such governments, and that sedition and rebellion are unbecoming every citizen thus protected, and should be punished acccordingly; and that all governments have a right to enact such laws as in their own judgments are best calculated to secure the public interest, at the same time, however, holding sacred the freedom of conscience.
6 We believe that every man should be honored in his station: rulers and magistrates as such—being placed for the protection of the innocent and the punishment of the guilty; and that to the laws all men owe respect and deference, as without them peace and harmony would be supplanted by anarchy and [p. 441]
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