Doctrine and Covenants, 1844

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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8 Now faith is the substance -[assurance]- of  things hoped for, the evidence of things not  seen.
9 From this we learn, that faith is the as surance which men have of the existence of  things which they have not seen; and the  principle of action in all intelligent beings.
10 If men were duly to consider them selves, and turn their thoughts and reflections  to the operations of their own minds, they  would readily discover that it is faith, and  faith only, which is the moving cause of all  action, in them; that without it, both mind  and body would be in a state of inactivity,  and all their exertions would cease, both phys ical and mental.
11 Were this class to go back and reflect  upon the history of their lives, from the period  of their first recollection, and ask themselves,  what principle excited them to action, or what  gave them energy and activity, in all their law ful avocations, callings and pursuits, what  would be the answer? Would it not be that  it was the assurance which we had of the ex istence of things which we had not seen, as  yet?—Was it not the hope which you had, in  consequence of your belief in the existence of  unseen things, which stimulated you to action  and exertion, in order to obtain them? Are  you not dependent on your faith, or belief,  for the acquisition of all knowledge, wisdom  and intelligence? Would you exert your selves to obtain wisdom and intelligence, un less you did believe that you could obtain  them? Would you have ever sown if you [p. 6]
8 Now faith is the substance -[assurance]- of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.
9 From this we learn, that faith is the assurance which men have of the existence of things which they have not seen; and the principle of action in all intelligent beings.
10 If men were duly to consider themselves, and turn their thoughts and reflections to the operations of their own minds, they would readily discover that it is faith, and faith only, which is the moving cause of all action, in them; that without it, both mind and body would be in a state of inactivity, and all their exertions would cease, both physical and mental.
11 Were this class to go back and reflect upon the history of their lives, from the period of their first recollection, and ask themselves, what principle excited them to action, or what gave them energy and activity, in all their lawful avocations, callings and pursuits, what would be the answer? Would it not be that it was the assurance which we had of the existence of things which we had not seen, as yet?—Was it not the hope which you had, in consequence of your belief in the existence of unseen things, which stimulated you to action and exertion, in order to obtain them? Are you not dependent on your faith, or belief, for the acquisition of all knowledge, wisdom and intelligence? Would you exert yourselves to obtain wisdom and intelligence, unless you did believe that you could obtain them? Would you have ever sown if you [p. 6]
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