Grammar and Alphabet of the Egyptian Language, circa July–circa November 1835

  • Source Note
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No. Character Grammar & A[l]phabet of the Egyptian Language
1 H This is called Za Ki=oan hiash, <or> chal sidon hiash. This character is in the fiftth degree, independent and abitrary. It may be preseved in the fifth degree while it stands independent and arbitrary: That is, without a straight mark inserted above or below it. By inserting a straight mark
2 H over it thus, (2) it increases its signification five
3 H degrees: by inserting two straight lines, thus: (3) its signification is increased five times more. By inserting
4 H three straight lines thus (4) its signification is again increased five times more than the last. By counting the numbers of st[r]aight lines and preseving them, or considering them as qualifying adjectives we have the degrees of comparison There are five connecting parts of speech in the above character, called Za-ki an hish These five connecting parts of speech, for verbs, participles— prepositions, conjuntions, and adverbs. In translation translating this chara[c]ter, this subject must be continued until there are as many of these connecting parts of speech used as there are connections or connecting parts found in the character. But whinever the character is found with one horizontal line, as at (2) the subject must be continued until twice <five times> the number of connecting parts of speech are used; or, the full sense of the writer is not conveyed. When two horizontal lines occur, the number of conne[c]ting parts of speech are continued five times furthr— or five degrees. And when three horizontal lines are found, the number of connections are to be increased five time further. The character alone has 5 parts of speech: increase by one straight line thus 5x5 is 25
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No. Character Grammar & Alphabet of the Egyptian Language
1 H This is called Za Ki=oan hiash, or chal sidon hiash. This character is in the fiftth degree, independent and abitrary. It may be preseved in the fifth degree while it stands independent and arbitrary: That is, without a straight mark inserted above or below it. By inserting a straight mark
2 H over it thus, (2) it increases its signification five
3 H degrees: by inserting two straight lines, thus: (3) its signification is increased five times more. By inserting
4 H three straight lines thus (4) its signification is again increased five times more than the last. By counting the numbers of straight lines or considering them as qualifying adjectives we have the degrees of comparison There are five connecting parts of speech in the above character, called Za-ki an hish These five connecting parts of speech, for verbs, participles— prepositions, conjuntions, and adverbs. In translating this character, this subject must be continued until there are as many of these connecting parts of speech used as there are connections or connecting parts found in the character. But whinever the character is found with one horizontal line, as at (2) the subject must be continued until five times the number of connecting parts of speech are used; or, the full sense of the writer is not conveyed. When two horizontal lines occur, the number of connecting parts of speech are continued five times furthr— or five degrees. And when three horizontal lines are found, the number of connections are to be increased five time further. The character alone has 5 parts of speech: increase by one straight line thus 5x5 is 25
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