John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 77
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Chapter 24
<Chap 24>
<Reflections. Terms of peace. Surrender of Smith and others. Arms surrendered. Place guarded. Prisoners and arms taken to .>
<This order greatly agitated my mind. I expected we should be exterminated without fail. There lay three thousand> men highly excited and full of revenge veangance and in as mutch as the officers could do to do to keep them off from us any how, and they now had authority from the to exterminate with orders to cut of[f] our retreat, and the word Mormons I thought included innocent as well as guilty. so of cours there was no escape for any. Theese were my first reflections on hearing the order. But soon said that they would be more mild than the order required; that if we would give up the heads of the church to be punished; surrendr our arms; give up all our property, (those who had taken up arms,) to pay the debts of the whole church and the damages done in and elsewhere, and then all except leave the state forthwith except those retained to be punished, they would spare our lives and protect us out of the . The sun was then about two hours high and he gave us till sunset to make up our minds and deliver the prisoners. A man gentleman of note told me that if these men was suffered to escape, Or if they could not be found nothing could save the place from destruction and the people from extermination. We knew that had no authority and his requirements were illegal for he was out of the bounds of his Division and the s order was to and not to him: but there was no other way for the Mormons but to submit. We immediately went into town and collected Joseph Smith Junr , , [p. 77]
Chapter 24
Chap 24
Reflections. Terms of peace. Surrender of Smith and others. Arms surrendered. Place guarded. Prisoners and arms taken to .
This order greatly agitated my mind. I expected we should be exterminated without fail. There lay three thousand men highly excited and full of veangance and as mutch as the officers could do to keep them off from us any how, and they now had authority from the to exterminate with orders to cut off our retreat, and the word Mormons I thought included innocent as well as guilty. so of cours there was no escape for any. Theese were my first reflections on hearing the order. But soon said that they would be more mild than the order required; that if we would give up the heads of the church to be punished; surrendr our arms; give up all our property, (those who had taken up arms,) to pay the debts of the whole church and the damages done in and elsewhere, and then all leave the state forthwith except those retained to be punished, they would spare our lives and protect us out of the . The sun was then about two hours high and he gave us till sunset to make up our minds and deliver the prisoners. A gentleman of note told me that if these men was suffered to escape, Or if they could not be found nothing could save the place from destruction and the people from extermination. We knew that had no authority and his requirements were illegal for he was out of the bounds of his Division and the s order was to and not to him: but there was no other way for the Mormons but to submit. We immediately went into town and collected Joseph Smith Junr , , [p. 77]
Page 77