John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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in their behalf to the Legislature setting forth a short history of their difficulties from their first settlement in to the present time and praying the Legislature to recind the s recind the exterminating order under which they were compeled to leave the , and also release them from the deed of trust made in duress, pay them for their arms or return them, and pay them for their arms taken from them as well as othr damages sustained by them in and let them have the privilege of living in the . (When took their arms in he agreed to return them as soon as they left the , but this he refused to do even on the s order for them.) Some two hundred families have left and others are preparing to go, But those some are desirous to stay in the , and their object in getting up the petition was to be relieved from their expelling contract so that men should not have the privilege of abusing them under a legal pretence, thinking it was right because they agreed to leave the thought that contract was strictly in illegal. This petition I presented to the Legislature on the 19 Dec. It produced some excitement, and in the house and was laid on the table for the present. I will now state
Chapter 26
Chap 26
Bible translated. Egyptian mummies. Increase and numbers of the church. Opposition. law Laws of consecration. Terms established. Their effect. [p. 82]
in their behalf to the Legislature setting forth a short history of their difficulties from their first settlement in to the present time and praying the Legislature to recind the s exterminating order under which they were compeled to leave the , and also release them from the deed of trust made in duress, pay them for their arms or return them, and pay them for their arms taken from them as well as othr damages sustained by them in and let them have the privilege of living in the . (When took their arms in he agreed to return them as soon as they left the , but this he refused to do even on the s order for them.) Some two hundred families have left and others are preparing to go, But some are desirous to stay in the , and their object in getting up the petition was to be relieved from their expelling contract so that men should not have the privilege of abusing them under a legal pretence, thinking it was right because they agreed to leave the though that contract was strictly illegal. This petition I presented to the Legislature on the 19 Dec. It produced some excitement, in the house and was laid on the table for the present.
Chapter 26
Chap 26
Bible translated. Egyptian mummies. Increase and numbers of the church. Opposition. Laws of consecration. Terms established. Their effect. [p. 82]
Page 82