John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [59]
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Chapter 18
<(15) Chap 18>
<Fourth of July celebrated. s oration. The Election.>
<The church celebrated the fourth of July by raising a liberty pole on which they hoisted the American flag.> <They also> formed a civil and military procession, and delivered an oration in which there were one or two sentences to which considerable exceptions was taken by the people of other counties. The substance was, that they did not mean to suffer vexacious law suits and other abuses as they had done,— but if a mob fell on them they would resist and would follow them to their houses and it should be a war of extermination to one or the other party. This spirit was kept up untill the church, or many individuals, became so inspired with it that we they would not hear any offence.
As the Danites had covenanted and agreed to support the heads of the church in all things, so of course they must controll the elections as well as othr matters. Therefore they got up a meeting of their <Danite> officers on saturday before the election, and appointed a committe[e] consisting of one man from each tow[n]ship in the , who called upon the first presidency to assist them in making out a nomination. Accordingly a ticket was made out to suit them and a sufficent number printed that night. The next day another meeting of the Danites was conveaned two hundred or more in number, and these tickets divided out among them. They agreed to scatter them through out the county of and support it the next morning at the polls, which they did. The people supposed that this ticket was from head quarters and that it was the will of God that all should go for it. But many saw that it was taking an undue advantage of the election, and were extremely dissatisfied; not so much with the ticket itself as with the principle [p. [59]]
Chapter 18
(15) Chap 18
Fourth of July celebrated. s oration. The Election.
The church celebrated the fourth of July by raising a liberty pole on which they hoisted the American flag. They also formed a civil and military procession, and delivered an oration in which there were one or two sentences to which considerable exception was taken by the people of other counties. The substance was, that they did not mean to suffer vexacious law suits and other abuses as they had done,— but if a mob fell on them they would resist and would follow them to their houses and it should be a war of extermination to one or the other party. This spirit was kept up until the church, or many individuals, became so inspired with it that they would not hear any offence.
As the Danites had covenanted and agreed to support the heads of the church in all things, so of course they must control the elections as well as othr matters. Therefore they got up a meeting of their Danite officers on saturday before the election, and appointed a committee consisting of one man from each township in the , who called upon the first presidency to assist them in making out a nomination. Accordingly a ticket was made out to suit them and a sufficent number printed that night. The next day another meeting of the Danites was conveaned two hundred or more in number, and these tickets divided out among them. They agreed to scatter them through out the county of and support it the next morning at the polls, which they did. The people supposed that this ticket was from head quarters and that it was the will of God that all should go for it. But many saw that it was taking an undue advantage of the election, and were extremely dissatisfied; not so much with the ticket itself as with the principle [p. [59]]
Page [59]