John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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would become a majority, or from some other cause, I know not what, (for the Mormons had committed no crime,) continued to stir up excitement, and the Mormons began to prepare for self defence, untill the more rational and sensible part of the citizens saw that it was coming to bloodshed, and that something must be done. They accordingly appointed a committe who called upon the Mormons to meet them in conference, which they did, and agreed to leave the . The committe agreed to, and did help them to obtain a place of residence, which was in the teritory of , since organized into the county of , and the people in the vicinity agreed consented to it. The Mormons purchased great quantities of land in ; made improvements, and their works plainly shew that they were industrious, though they labored under many disadvantages on account of their poverty and former difficulties. Many of them were obliged to seek labor in the neighboring counties for their bread. The people gave them employment, and many of them also borrowed money to purchase lands with. Friendship began to be restored between them and their neighbors. The old prejudices prejudices were fast dying away, and they were doing well, [p. 45]
would become a majority, or from some other cause, I know not what, (for the Mormons had committed no crime,) continued to stir up excitement, and the Mormons began to prepare for self defence, until the more rational and sensible part of the citizens saw that it was coming to bloodshed, and that something must be done. They accordingly appointed a committe who called upon the Mormons to meet them in conference, which they did, and agreed to leave the . The committe agreed to, and did help them to obtain a place of residence, which was in the teritory of , since organized into the county of , and the people in the vicinity consented to it. The Mormons purchased great quantities of land in ; made improvements, and their works plainly shew that they were industrious, though they labored under many disadvantages on account of their poverty and former difficulties. Many of them were obliged to seek labor in the neighboring counties for their bread. The people gave them employment, and many of them also borrowed money to purchase lands with. Friendship began to be restored between them and their neighbors. The old prejudices were fast dying away, and they were doing well, [p. 45]
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