Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 218
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Letter to Edward Hunter • 21 December 1841

Copy of a letter To . Dec. 21st. 1841
Beloved Brother,
Yours of the 27[th] of Oct. came to hand at a  late date, but <&> I am now able to say to you that the power  of attorney is executed and sent up to the clerk’s office for the seal  of State, & will be forwarded direct from thence; it is now on the way most probably.
Your letter did not arrive till after Mr <Ephraim> Potter returned with the goods  which I received in safety, and Bro Potter has started on a mission to the  inhabitants of Jamaica, one of the West India Isle—
I will accept the goods as you propose on your debt, so far as it  goes, and answer the remainder on the payments which you  mentioned, as they become due.
I have purchased 90 acres of Timber land in the vicinity of  a little up the river, & have made proposals to , but  as yet am waiting for him to receive answers from his correspondent  in the East. I shall be able to purchase all the woodland you will  want in a little time.—
As it respects steam engines & mills My opinion is, we  cannot have too many of them. This place has suffered exceedingly  for <want of> such Mills in our midst, and neither one nor two can do the  business of this place another Season. We have no good grain  or board mill in this place, and most of our flour & lumber has  to be brought 20 miles which subjects us to great inconvenience.
The is rapidly advancing & many new buildings  have been erected since you left us, and many more would have  arisen, if brick and lumber could have been obtained. There is  scarce any limits which can be imagined to the mills. & machinery  & manufacturing of all kinds which might be put into profitable  operation in this city, & even if others should raise a mill  before you get here, it need be no discouragement either to you  or to Bro [Henry] Buckwalter, for it will be difficult for the mills to  keep pace with the growth of the place. & you will do  well to bring the engine, If you can persuade any of the  brethren who are manufacturers of woollens or cottons to come  and establish their business, do so.—
I have not ascertained deffinitely as yet, how far the  goods will go towards liquidating ’s note, or finishing  your house, but this I can say, I will make the most of it.  and benefit you every way possible way.
Carried over— [p. 218]

Letter to Edward Hunter • 21 December 1841

Copy of a letter To . Dec. 21st. 1841
Beloved Brother,
Yours of the 27[th] of Oct. came to hand & I am now able to say to you that the power of attorney is executed and sent up to the clerk’s office for the seal of State, & will be forwarded direct from thence; it is now on the way most probably.
Your letter did not arrive till after Mr Ephraim Potter returned with the goods which I received in safety, Bro Potter has started on a mission to the inhabitants of Jamaica, one of the West India Isle—
I will accept the goods as you propose on your debt, so far as it goes, and answer the remainder on the payments which you mentioned, as they become due.
I have purchased 90 acres of Timber land in the vicinity of a little up the river, I shall be able to purchase all the woodland you will want in a little time.—
As it respects steam engines & mills My opinion is, we cannot have too many of them. This place has suffered exceedingly for want of such Mills in our midst, and neither one nor two can do the business of this place another Season. We have no good grain or board mill in this place, and most of our flour & lumber has to be brought 20 miles which subjects us to great inconvenience.
The is rapidly advancing many new buildings have been erected since you left us, and many more would have arisen, if brick and lumber could have been obtained. There is scarce any limits which can be imagined to the mills. machinery & manufacturing of all kinds which might be put into profitable operation in this city, & even if others should raise a mill before you get here, it need be no discouragement either to you or to Bro Henry Buckwalter, for it will be difficult for the mills to keep pace with the growth of the place. & you will do well to bring the engine, If you can persuade any of the brethren who are manufacturers of woollens or cottons to come and establish their business, do so.—
I have not ascertained deffinitely as yet, how far the goods will go towards liquidating ’s note, or finishing your house, but this I can say, I will make the most of it. and benefit you every possible way.
Carried over— [p. 218]
Page 218