Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 169
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the general point of concentration for the Mormon people? for at that point I desire to locate, and ever remain.
My anxiety to be with [you] is daily increasing, and I shall wind up my professional business immediately, and proceed to your blissful abode, if you think it best. Look at all my letters and papers and write me forth with. You are aware that at the time of your most bitter persecution, I was with you in feeling & proffered you my military knowledge & prowess. My faith is still strong— I believe the God of the whole earth will avenge your wrongs in time as well as in eternity, O. my friends! go on and prosper; and may the God of all grace save you with an everlasting salvation.
Yours respectfully
Letter from John C. Bennett • 25 July 1840
Ill.— July 25th. 1840
Rev & Dear Friends:—
The last time I wrote you was during the pendency of your difficulties with the Missourians. You are aware that at that time I held the office of “Brigadier General of the Invincible Dragoons” of this and proffered you my entire energies for your deliverance from a ruthless and Savage, tho. Cowardly foe; but the Lord came to your rescue and saved you with a powerful arm. I am happy to find that you are now in a civilized land, and in the enjoyment of peace, and happiness. Some months ago I resigned my office with an intention of removing to your town, & joining your people; but hitherto I have been prevented: I hope however to remove to and unite with your next spring. I believe I should be much happier with you. I have many things to communicate which I would prefer doing orally, and I propose to meet you in on the first mondav in Dec. next as I shall be there at that time on state and ’ business.
If I remove to I expect to follow my profession, and to that end I enclose you a slip from the “Louisville [p. 169]
the general point of concentration for the Mormon people? for at that point I desire to locate, and ever remain.
My anxiety to be with [you] is daily increasing, and I shall wind up my professional business immediately, and proceed to your blissful abode, if you think it best. Look at all my letters and papers and write me forth with. You are aware that at the time of your most bitter persecution, I was with you in feeling & proffered you my military knowledge & prowess. My faith is still strong— I believe the God of the whole earth will avenge your wrongs in time as well as in eternity, O. my friends! go on and prosper; and may the God of all grace save you with an everlasting salvation.
Yours respectfully
Letter from John C. Bennett • 25 July 1840
Ill.— July 25th. 1840
Rev & Dear Friends:—
The last time I wrote you was during the pendency of your difficulties with the Missourians. You are aware that at that time I held the office of “Brigadier General of the Invincible Dragoons” of this and proffered you my entire energies for your deliverance from a ruthless and Savage, tho. Cowardly foe; but the Lord came to your rescue and saved you with a powerful arm. I am happy to find that you are now in a civilized land, and in the enjoyment of peace, and happiness. Some months ago I resigned my office with an intention of removing to your town, & joining your people; but hitherto I have been prevented: I hope however to remove to and unite with your next spring. I believe I should be much happier with you. I have many things to communicate which I would prefer doing orally, and I propose to meet you in on the first mondav in Dec. next as I shall be there at that time on state and ’ business.
If I remove to I expect to follow my profession, and to that end I enclose you a slip from the “Louisville [p. 169]
Page 169