Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 18
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Letter, Thomas B. Marsh and Orson Hyde to Lewis and Ann Marsh Abbott • 25–30 October 1838

Dear and Sister Abbot [Ann Marsh Abbott].
I determined this day to leave here  for the , either to descend it or cross it into the . I have left  the Mormons D Joseph Smith Jr for conscience sake, and that alone, for  I have come to the full conclusion that he is a very wicked man; notwithstanding  all my efforts to persuade myself to the Contra. I also am well convinced that  he will not escape the judgements of an offended God who pleads the cause  of the innocent.— I speak now of the innocent who are led by his deceitful  tongue &c. I fear the Lord and intend to serve him all my days, and preach  the Gospel of Salvation.
The operations which are against you now are  from the Mob and not from any legal authority. They are not numerous and  I think that you have nothing to fear from them at present. But the people  here, more merciful than the Nero Joseph Smith or ; are  willing to render any assistance in their power to enable those among you to make  their escape who wish to.
The disposition manifested in J. Smith and to pillage, rob, plunder  assassinate and murder, was never equalled, in my estimation, unless by some  desperado Bandit. O my God what principles to be called the religion  of Jesus Christ. I thank thee O my Father that thou hast delivered me so far  from them thus far, and I pray thee to forever deliver me from such base  principles, and lead my feet in the paths of uprightness and truth.
For the burning the Post Office in , for pillaging goods &c  in . The Government will undoubtedly take notice, & I fear that many  innocent among you will have to suffer. O my sister my be up  and out of that place before it is too late, for fear for your safety. I know  more about this matter than you. Be advised by your , and escape  for your lives, for I verily believe that God will destroy that place.
I intended to have left you the deed for the place you  live on but forgot it, I will however convey it to you by mail.  After I get settled I will endeavour to let you know hear from me again. May  God bless you and deliver you, with all the innocent from the impending Storm  is the prayer of your unworthy brother.
October <the> 25th. 1838
P. S. The corn and potatoes which I have left you  are welcome <to>, also the two sows and pigs, also the yearlen heifer belonging to my   which runs about or es house are at your disposal, make  the best of them you can. The enclosed note on Seth Thompson is for a mare [p. 18]

Letter, Thomas B. Marsh and Orson Hyde to Lewis and Ann Marsh Abbott • 25–30 October 1838

Dear and Sister Abbot [Ann Marsh Abbott].
I determined this day to leave here for the , either to descend it or cross it into the . I have left the Mormons D Joseph Smith Jr for conscience sake, and that alone, for I have come to the full conclusion that he is a very wicked man; notwithstanding all my efforts to persuade myself to the Contra. I also am well convinced that he will not escape the judgements of an offended God who pleads the cause of the innocent.— I speak now of the innocent who are led by his deceitful tongue &c. I fear the Lord and intend to serve him all my days, and preach the Gospel of Salvation.
The operations which are against you now are from the Mob and not from any legal authority. They are not numerous and I think that you have nothing to fear from them at present. But the people here, more merciful than the Nero Joseph Smith or ; are willing to render any assistance in their power to enable those among you to make their escape who wish to.
The disposition manifested in J. Smith and to pillage, rob, plunder assassinate and murder, was never equalled, in my estimation, unless by some desperado Bandit. O my God what principles to be called the religion of Jesus Christ. I thank thee O my Father that thou hast delivered me from them thus far, and I pray thee to forever deliver me from such base principles, and lead my feet in the paths of uprightness and truth.
For the burning the Post Office in , for pillaging goods &c in . The Government will undoubtedly take notice, & I fear that many innocent among you will have to suffer. O my sister my be up and out of that place before it is too late, for fear for your safety. I know more about this matter than you. Be advised by your , and escape for your lives, for I verily believe that God will destroy that place.
I intended to have left you the deed for the place you live on but forgot it, I will however convey it to you by mail. After I get settled I will endeavour to let you hear from me again. May God bless you and deliver you, with all the innocent from the impending Storm is the prayer of your unworthy brother.
October the 25th. 1838
P. S. The corn and potatoes which I have left you are welcome to, also the two sows and pigs, also the yearlen heifer belonging to my which runs about or es house are at your disposal, make the best of them you can. The enclosed note on Seth Thompson is for a mare [p. 18]
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