Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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I do not say that you shall go now, but you must not think of staying here another season, or of putting <in> crops for the moment you do so, the citizens will be upon you, and if I am called here again in case of non-compliance with the treaty made, do not think that I shall act any more as I have done now; You need not expect any mercy, but extermination, for I am determined the ’s orders shall be executed.— As for your leaders, do not once think do not imagine for a moment, do not let it enter into your minds, that they will be delivered and restored to you again; for their fate is fixed, the die is cast, their doom is sealed.— I am sorry gentlemen to see so many apparently intelligent men found in the situation that you are, and Oh! Could I invoke that great spirit of the Unknown God to rest upon you, and deliver you from that awful chain of superstition, and liberate you from those fetters of fanaticism with which you are bound, that you no longer do homage to a man.
I would advise you to scatter abroad, And never again organize yourselves with Bishops, Presidents &c lest you excite the jealousies of the people and subject yourselves to the same calamities that have now come upon you. You have always been the aggressors, You have brought upon yourselves these difficulties by being disaffected, and not being subject to rule, And my advice is that you become as other Citizens, lest by a recurrence of these events you bring upon yourselves irretrievable ruin.
Letter, Isaac Galland to David W. Rogers • 26 February 1839
Ill, Feby 26th 1839.
Mr
Dear Sir
Your’s of the 11th Inst was received yesterday I perceive that it had been written before your brethren visited my house— I had also wrote to Mr Barlow before I received yours, and which is herewith also sent. I wish here to remark that about 10 or 15 houses or cabbins can be had in this neighborhood, and several farms may be rented here. On the I think that more than 50 families can be accommodated with places to dwell in, but not a great quantity of cultivated land, As the improvements on that tract are generally new, there are however several farms which can also be rented. Since writing to Mr Barlow, I have conversed with a friend of mine, who has also conversed with of in relation to your Church and people. says, that the people called Mormons were good Citizens of the State of , and that he respects them now as good and virtuous citizens, and feels disposed to treat them [p. 1]
I do not say that you shall go now, but you must not think of staying here another season, or of putting in crops for the moment you do so, the citizens will be upon you, and if I am called here again in case of non-compliance with the treaty made, do not think that I shall act any more as I have done now; You need not expect any mercy, but extermination, for I am determined the ’s order shall be executed.— As for your leaders, do not once think do not imagine for a moment, do not let it enter into your minds, that they will be delivered and restored to you again; for their fate is fixed, the die is cast, their doom is sealed.— I am sorry gentlemen to see so many apparently intelligent men found in the situation that you are, and Oh! Could I invoke that great spirit the Unknown God to rest upon you, and deliver you from that awful chain of superstition, and liberate you from those fetters of fanaticism with which you are bound, that you no longer do homage to a man.
I would advise you to scatter abroad, And never again organize yourselves with Bishops, Presidents &c lest you excite the jealousies of the people and subject yourselves to the same calamities that have now come upon you. You have always been the aggressors, You have brought upon yourselves these difficulties by being disaffected, and not being subject to rule, And my advice is that you become as other Citizens, lest by a recurrence of these events you bring upon yourselves irretrievable ruin.
Letter, Isaac Galland to David W. Rogers • 26 February 1839
Ill, Feby 26th 1839.
Mr
Dear Sir
Your’s of the 11th Inst was received yesterday I perceive that it had been written before your brethren visited my house— I had also wrote to Mr Barlow before I received yours, and which is herewith also sent. I wish here to remark that about 10 or 15 houses or cabbins can be had in this neighborhood, and several farms may be rented here. On the I think that more than 50 families can be accommodated with places to dwell in, but not a great quantity of cultivated land, As the improvements on that tract are generally new, there are however several farms which can also be rented. Since writing to Mr Barlow, I have conversed with a friend of mine, who has also conversed with of in relation to your Church and people. says, that the people called Mormons were good Citizens of the State of , and that he respects them now as good and virtuous citizens, and feels disposed to treat them [p. 1]
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