Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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asking leave of any one. In the meantime, men were abused, women insulted  and abused by the troops, and all this while we were kept prisoners.
Whilst the town was guarded, we were called together by the order of  And a guard placed close around us, and in that situation, were compelled to  sign a deed of trust for the purpose of making our individual property all holden,  as they said to pay all the debts of every individual belonging to the Church, and also to  pay for all damages the old inhabitants of may have sustained in con sequence of the late difficulties in that .
was now  arrived, and the first important move made by him, was the collecting of our men  together on the Square and selected out about fifty of them, whom he immediately mar ched into a house and confined close; this was done without the aid of the Sheriff, or of  any legal process. The next day 46 of those taken were driven like a parcel of  menial slaves, off to , not knowing why they were taken, or what they  were taken for. After being confined in more than two weeks, about  one half were liberated, the rest, after another week’s confinement were most of them  required to appear at Court, and have since been let to bail.
Since withdrew his troops from , parties  of armed men have gone through the , driving off horses, sheep and Cattle and  also plundering houses. The barbarity of ’ troops ought not to  be passed over in silence. They shot our cattle and hogs, merely for the sake of  destroying them, leaving for the ravens to eat. They took prisoner an aged man by  the name of , and without any reason for it, he was struck over the head with  a gun which laid his skull bare. Another man by the name of [William] Carey was also  taken prisoner by them, and without any provocation, had his brains dashed out  with a gun. He was laid in a waggon, and there permitted to remain for the  space of 24 hours, during which time no one was permitted to administer to him  comfort or consolation, and after he was removed from that situation, he lived but a  few hours. The destruction of property, at and about , is very great.  Many are stripped bare as it were, and others partially so, indeed take us as a body  at this time, we are a poor and afflicted people, and if we are compelled to leave the   in the Spring, many, yes a large portion of our society will have to be removed  at the expense of the , as those who otherwise might have helped them, are  now debarred that privilege, in consequence of the deed of trust, we were compel led to sign, which deed so operated upon our real estate that it will sell for but little  or nothing at this time. We have now made a brief statement of some of the  most prominent features of the troubles that have befallen our people since their first  settlement in this , and we believe that these persecutions have come in conse quence of our religious faith, and not for any immorality on our part. That [p. 31]
asking leave of any one. In the meantime, men were abused, women insulted and abused by the troops, and all this while we were kept prisoners.
Whilst the town was guarded, we were called together by the order of And a guard placed close around us, and in that situation, were compelled to sign a deed of trust for the purpose of making our individual property all holden, as they said to pay all the debts of every individual belonging to the Church, and also to pay for all damages the old inhabitants of may have sustained in consequence of the late difficulties in that .
was now arrived, and the first important move made by him, was the collecting of our men together on the Square and selected out about fifty of them, whom he immediately marched into a house and confined close; this was done without the aid of the Sheriff, or of any legal process. The next day 46 of those taken were driven like a parcel of menial slaves, off to , not knowing why they were taken, or what they were taken for. After being confined in more than two weeks, about one half were liberated, the rest, after another week’s confinement were most of them required to appear at Court, and have since been let to bail.
Since withdrew his troops from , parties of armed men have gone through the , driving off horses, sheep and Cattle and also plundering houses. The barbarity of ’ troops ought not to be passed over in silence. They shot our cattle and hogs, merely for the sake of destroying them, leaving for the ravens to eat. They took prisoner an aged man by the name of , and without any reason for it, he was struck over the head with a gun which laid his skull bare. Another man by the name of William Carey was also taken prisoner by them, and without any provocation, had his brains dashed out with a gun. He was laid in a waggon, and there permitted to remain for the space of 24 hours, during which time no one was permitted to administer to him comfort or consolation, and after he was removed from that situation, he lived but a few hours. The destruction of property, at and about , is very great. Many are stripped bare as it were, and others partially so, indeed take us as a body at this time, we are a poor and afflicted people, and if we are compelled to leave the in the Spring, many, yes a large portion of our society will have to be removed at the expense of the , as those who otherwise might have helped them, are now debarred that privilege, in consequence of the deed of trust, we were compelled to sign, which deed so operated upon our real estate that it will sell for but little or nothing at this time. We have now made a brief statement of some of the most prominent features of the troubles that have befallen our people since their first settlement in this , and we believe that these persecutions have come in consequence of our religious faith, and not for any immorality on our part. That [p. 31]
Page 31