Times and Seasons, 15 July 1842

  • Source Note
Page 855
gress of the flames. This was completely effected by Sunday morning. The Senate ordered every person to leave town and nothing could exceed the heartrending spectacle of thousands of poor people frantic with their losses, and without the means of procuring food or shelter.
The destruction of Hamburgh is one of those calamities which will be felt in every part of the commerical world.— Great as may be the credit of the Senate and people of Hamburgh with foreign states, a century will elapse before the city can be replaced in all the prosperity destroyed by this conflagration. In the midst of the confusion an incident occurred characteristic of the government and the people. A public notice was every where put up, stating that the vault under the bank, containing the gold and silver bars, were fire proof, and that the bank books were all removed in perfect safety,
The Hamburgh Noue Zeitung of the 10th inst. thus sums up the results of the sad catastrophe:—
“Sixty streets, containing from 1500 to 2000 houses, lie smouldering on the ground, and form a fearful but picturesque ruin. Two splended churches, with steeples exceeding 400 feet in height, another church with its tower, the Rath Haus, where the Senate hold their sittings, the old Exchange, the repository of archives, the building of the Patriotic Society, are all destroyed. Reichspost Amt, nearly all the booksellers, the offices of two newspapers, (the Borsenballe, and the Correspondent,) nearly all the the great hotels and inns, (the Old London, the Belvidere, Hotel de Ruisse, St. Petersburgh, Street’s Hotel, the Crown Prince, the Wild Man, the Bramer Anthaus, the Black Elephant,) the principle magazins des modes and repositories of fashion, and nearly all the chief apothecaries, are destroyed. The following are safe:—The cellar where the bullion is deposited at the bank, the Catharinenstrase der Wandralune, du Reichenstrase, &c.”
 
————
Religion.—Is a flower whose bud is peace, whose blossom is joy unspeakable, and whose fruit is everlasting glory.
If you would be truly happy, strive to make others so and learn to cultivate good feelings towards all mankind.
 
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TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1842.
——————————
 
THE GOVERNMENT OF GOD.
The government of the Almighty, has always been very dissimilar to the government of men; whether we refer to his religious government, or to the government of nations. The government of God has always tended to promote peace, unity, harmony, strength and happiness; while that of man has been productive of confusion, disorder, weakness and misery. The greatest acts of the mighty men have been to depopulate nations, and to overthrow kingdoms; and whilst they have exalted themselves and become glorious, it has been at the expense of the lives of the innocent—the blood of the oppressed—the moans of the widow, and the tears of the orphan. Egypt, Babylon, Greece, Persia, Carthage, Rome—each were raised to dignity amid the clash of arms, and the din of war; and whilst their triumphant leaders led forth their victorious armies to glory and victory, their ears were saluted with the groans of the dying, and the misery and distress of the human family;—before them the earth was a paradise, and behind them a desolate wilderness; their kingdoms were founded in carnage and bloodshed, and sustained by oppression, tyranny, and despotism. The designs of God, on the other hand, have been to promote the universal good, of the universal world;—to establish peace and good will among men;—to promote the principles of eternal truth;—to bring about a state of things that shall unite man to his fellow man—cause the world to “beat their swords into plow-shares, and their spears into pruning-hooks”—make the nations of the earth dwell in peace; and to bring about the millenial glory—when “the earth shall yield its increase, resume its paradisean glory, and become as the garden of the Lord.”
The great and wise of ancient days have failed in all their attempts to promote eternal power, peace, and happiness. Their nations have crumbled to pieces; their thrones have been cast down in their turn; and their cities, and their mightiest works of art have been annihilated; or their dilapidated towers, or time worn monuments have left us but feeble traits of their former magnificence, and ancient grandeur. They proclaim as with a voice of thunder, those imperishable truths—that man’s [p. 855]
gress of the flames. This was completely effected by Sunday morning. The Senate ordered every person to leave town and nothing could exceed the heartrending spectacle of thousands of poor people frantic with their losses, and without the means of procuring food or shelter.
The destruction of Hamburgh is one of those calamities which will be felt in every part of the commerical world.— Great as may be the credit of the Senate and people of Hamburgh with foreign states, a century will elapse before the city can be replaced in all the prosperity destroyed by this conflagration. In the midst of the confusion an incident occurred characteristic of the government and the people. A public notice was every where put up, stating that the vault under the bank, containing the gold and silver bars, were fire proof, and that the bank books were all removed in perfect safety,
The Hamburgh Noue Zeitung of the 10th inst. thus sums up the results of the sad catastrophe:—
“Sixty streets, containing from 1500 to 2000 houses, lie smouldering on the ground, and form a fearful but picturesque ruin. Two splended churches, with steeples exceeding 400 feet in height, another church with its tower, the Rath Haus, where the Senate hold their sittings, the old Exchange, the repository of archives, the building of the Patriotic Society, are all destroyed. Reichspost Amt, nearly all the booksellers, the offices of two newspapers, (the Borsenballe, and the Correspondent,) nearly all the the great hotels and inns, (the Old London, the Belvidere, Hotel de Ruisse, St. Petersburgh, Street’s Hotel, the Crown Prince, the Wild Man, the Bramer Anthaus, the Black Elephant,) the principle magazins des modes and repositories of fashion, and nearly all the chief apothecaries, are destroyed. The following are safe:—The cellar where the bullion is deposited at the bank, the Catharinenstrase der Wandralune, du Reichenstrase, &c.”
 
————
Religion.—Is a flower whose bud is peace, whose blossom is joy unspeakable, and whose fruit is everlasting glory.
If you would be truly happy, strive to make others so and learn to cultivate good feelings towards all mankind.
 
——————————
TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1842.
——————————
 
THE GOVERNMENT OF GOD.
The government of the Almighty, has always been very dissimilar to the government of men; whether we refer to his religious government, or to the government of nations. The government of God has always tended to promote peace, unity, harmony, strength and happiness; while that of man has been productive of confusion, disorder, weakness and misery. The greatest acts of the mighty men have been to depopulate nations, and to overthrow kingdoms; and whilst they have exalted themselves and become glorious, it has been at the expense of the lives of the innocent—the blood of the oppressed—the moans of the widow, and the tears of the orphan. Egypt, Babylon, Greece, Persia, Carthage, Rome—each were raised to dignity amid the clash of arms, and the din of war; and whilst their triumphant leaders led forth their victorious armies to glory and victory, their ears were saluted with the groans of the dying, and the misery and distress of the human family;—before them the earth was a paradise, and behind them a desolate wilderness; their kingdoms were founded in carnage and bloodshed, and sustained by oppression, tyranny, and despotism. The designs of God, on the other hand, have been to promote the universal good, of the universal world;—to establish peace and good will among men;—to promote the principles of eternal truth;—to bring about a state of things that shall unite man to his fellow man—cause the world to “beat their swords into plow-shares, and their spears into pruning-hooks”—make the nations of the earth dwell in peace; and to bring about the millenial glory—when “the earth shall yield its increase, resume its paradisean glory, and become as the garden of the Lord.”
The great and wise of ancient days have failed in all their attempts to promote eternal power, peace, and happiness. Their nations have crumbled to pieces; their thrones have been cast down in their turn; and their cities, and their mightiest works of art have been annihilated; or their dilapidated towers, or time worn monuments have left us but feeble traits of their former magnificence, and ancient grandeur. They proclaim as with a voice of thunder, those imperishable truths—that man’s [p. 855]
Page 855