Journal, 1835–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 162
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both in the fore and after-noon, and lectured  on, and translated Hebrew— we have cold  weather and fine sleighing
28 February 1836 • Sunday
Sunday the 28th This morning  two gentlemen late from Scotland called  to see me, to make inquiry about the  work of the Lord in these last days,  they treated me with respect, and the  interview was pleasing to me, and I pres ume interesting to them, they attended  our meeting, with me, and expressed  a satisfaction in what they heard
They spoke of Irvin [Edward Irving] the oriental reformer  and his prop[h]esies— after meeting,—  I returned home and spent the after  part of the day and evening in read ing and translating the Hebrew
29 February 1836 • Monday
Monday the 29th spent the day  in studying as usual.— a man called  to see the in company  with another gentleman, on entering  the door they were politely invited by  the gent[l]eman who has charge of the   to take of[f] their hats one of them  complyed with the request unhesitatingly  while the other obsereved that he would  not take of[f] his hat nor bow to Jo Smith  but that he had made Jo bow to  him at a certain time— he was imm ediately informed by the  keeper of the that his first buis ness was to leave <it> the house for when [p. 162]
both in the fore and after-noon, and lectured on, and translated Hebrew— we have cold weather and fine sleighing
28 February 1836 • Sunday
Sunday the 28th This morning two gentlemen late from Scotland called to see me, to make inquiry about the work of the Lord in these last days, they treated me with respect, and the interview was pleasing to me, and I presume interesting to them, they attended our meeting, with me, and expressed a satisfaction in what they heard
They spoke of Irvin [Edward Irving] the oriental reformer and his prophesies— after meeting,— I returned home and spent the after part of the day and evening in reading and translating the Hebrew
29 February 1836 • Monday
Monday the 29th spent the day in studying as usual.— a man called to see the in company with another gentleman, on entering the door they were politely invited by the gentleman who has charge of the to take off their hats one of them complyed with the request unhesitatingly while the other obsereved that he would not take off his hat nor bow to Jo Smith but that he had made Jo bow to him at a certain time— he was immediately informed by the keeper of the that his first buisness was to leave it for when [p. 162]
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