Journal, 1835–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 191
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convinced that he was wrong, and humbly con fessed it and asked my forgivness, which was readily  granted, he also wished to be received into the chur ch again by , and was received according to  his desire, he gave me his confession in writing

Editorial Note
The journal ends with two entries penned by , a scribe who had been writing history for JS. Unlike and other scribes in this journal, who referred to themselves in the third person and JS in the first, Warren Cowdery referred to JS in the third person. Cowdery’s work on JS’s 1834–1836 history also produced third-person accounts. In that endeavor, he had before him a first-person text (the earlier entries of this journal), which he changed to third person as he copied them into the history.
The first of ’s entries and the opening of the second read as if Cowdery were an observer of what he described. The account of the 3 April vision of Jesus Christ, however, reports details and a long direct quotation that only the two participants—JS and Warren’s younger brother —could have known. For this material, Warren Cowdery must have relied on another original text—no longer extant—or on oral reports from either or both of the participants. If Warren Cowdery was working from a prior text, that would directly parallel the method that produced the third-person 1834–1836 history. This account of the vision was later recast in first person as part of the history JS began in 1838, and in that form it was incorporated into the published Latter-day Saint canon (D&C 110) in 1876.

2 April 1836 • Saturday
Saturday April 2d  Transacted business, (although of a temporal nature) in compa ny with , , ,  & , which was to have a bearing upon the redemption  of . The positive manner in which he expressed  himself on this, <his> favorite theme, was directly calculated  to produce conviction in the minds of those who heard  him, that his whole soul was engaged in it. notwith standing on a superficial view of the same subject  they might differ from him in judgement. It was  determined in council, after mature deliberation,  that he and should act in concert in ra ising funds for the accomplishment of the aforesaid  object. As soon as the above plan was settled, he  and set out together, and their success was  such in one half day, as to give them pleasing  anticipations, and assure them that they were doing the  will of God and that his work prospered in their hands
3 April 1836 • Sunday
Sabbath April 3d  He attended meeting in the , assisted the other   of the Church in seating the congregation and  then became an attentive listener to the preaching from the  Stand. & spoke in the A. M. to an  attentive audience of about 1000 persons. In the P. M.  he assisted the other Presidents in distributing the elements  of the to the church, receiving them from the  Hands whose privilige it was to officiate in the  sacred desk this day. After having performed this service  to his brethren, he retired to the pulpit, the vails being dropped, [p. 191]
convinced that he was wrong, and humbly confessed it and asked my forgivness, which was readily granted, he also wished to be received into the church again by , and was received according to his desire, he gave me his confession in writing

Editorial Note
The journal ends with two entries penned by , a scribe who had been writing history for JS. Unlike and other scribes in this journal, who referred to themselves in the third person and JS in the first, Warren Cowdery referred to JS in the third person. Cowdery’s work on JS’s 1834–1836 history also produced third-person accounts. In that endeavor, he had before him a first-person text (the earlier entries of this journal), which he changed to third person as he copied them into the history.
The first of ’s entries and the opening of the second read as if Cowdery were an observer of what he described. The account of the 3 April vision of Jesus Christ, however, reports details and a long direct quotation that only the two participants—JS and Warren’s younger brother —could have known. For this material, Warren Cowdery must have relied on another original text—no longer extant—or on oral reports from either or both of the participants. If Warren Cowdery was working from a prior text, that would directly parallel the method that produced the third-person 1834–1836 history. This account of the vision was later recast in first person as part of the history JS began in 1838, and in that form it was incorporated into the published Latter-day Saint canon (D&C 110) in 1876.

2 April 1836 • Saturday
Saturday April 2d Transacted business, (although of a temporal nature) in company with , , , & , which was to have a bearing upon the redemption of . The positive manner in which he expressed himself on this, his favorite theme, was directly calculated to produce conviction in the minds of those who heard him, that his whole soul was engaged in it. notwithstanding on a superficial view of the same subject they might differ from him in judgement. It was determined in council, after mature deliberation, that he and should act in concert in raising funds for the accomplishment of the aforesaid object. As soon as the above plan was settled, he and set out together, and their success was such in one half day, as to give them pleasing anticipations, assure them that they were doing the will of God and that his work prospered in their hands
3 April 1836 • Sunday
Sabbath April 3d He attended meeting in the , assisted the other of the Church in seating the congregation and then became an attentive listener to the preaching from the Stand. & spoke in the A. M. to an attentive audience of about 1000 persons. In the P. M. he assisted the other Presidents in distributing the elements of the to the church, receiving them from the whose privilige it was to officiate in the sacred desk this day. After having performed this service to his brethren, he retired to the pulpit, the vails being dropped, [p. 191]
Page 191