Journal, 1835–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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, and also upon  Elder and some others, for which  I am grieved beyond expression, and  can only pray God to forgive him inasmuch  as he repents of his wickedness, and humbles  himself before the Lord.

17 December 1835 • Thursday

Thursday morning 17th at  home,— quite unwell,— This morning Elder   called to see me, and presented  me with a copy of the letter that he hand ed me on Tuesday last, which I had lost
The following is a copy.
Dec 15th 1835
President Smith
Sir you may esteem it a  novel circumstance to receive a written commu nication from me at this time.
My reasons for writing are the following. I  have some things which I wish to communicate  to you, and feeling a greater liberty to do it by  writing alone by myself, I take this method;  and it is generally the case that you are thronged  with buisness and not convenient to spend m uch time in conversing upon subjects of the  following nature. Therefore let these excu ses paliate the novelty of the circumstance  and patiently hear my recital.
After the committee had received their stock  of fall and winter goods, I went to  and told him that I was destitute of a cloak and  wanted him to trust me until Spring for  materials to make one. He told me that [p. 70]
, and also upon Elder and some others, for which I am grieved beyond expression, and can only pray God to forgive him inasmuch as he repents of his wickedness, and humbles himself before the Lord.

17 December 1835 • Thursday

Thursday morning 17th at home,— quite unwell,— This morning Elder called to see me, and presented me with a copy of the letter that he handed me on Tuesday last, which I had lost
The following is a copy.
Dec 15th 1835
President Smith
Sir you may esteem it a novel circumstance to receive a written communication from me at this time.
My reasons for writing are the following. I have some things which I wish to communicate to you, and feeling a greater liberty to do it by writing alone by myself, I take this method; and it is generally the case that you are thronged with buisness and not convenient to spend much time in conversing upon subjects of the following nature. Therefore let these excuses paliate the novelty of the circumstance and patiently hear my recital.
After the committee had received their stock of fall and winter goods, I went to and told him that I was destitute of a cloak and wanted him to trust me until Spring for materials to make one. He told me that [p. 70]
Page 70