History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<1841  Augt. 7.> On the 26th. September he started on a mission to the States of Tennessee  and Kentucky to collect means to buy out the claims and property  of the Mobbers in Mo. During his absence his  and two little children were driven by the mob from his habitation,  and she was compelled to carry her children three miles through snow  three inches deep, and wading through which was waist  deep during the inclement weather. He returned about the 25th.  of December after a very tedious mission, having travelled  1500 miles, 650 of which were on foot. I extract the following  from his journal:
“On the 30th. day of September 1838, I in company  with , and went  on board the “Kansas”, (which had one wheel broke;) the was  very low, & full of snags and sand bars. Generals  and of , Coll. Thompson from  Platte purchase, and many others of the active mobbers were  on board, as also General . On touching at   on 1st. October for wood, we found about 70 of the  brethren with their families surrounded by an armed mob  of upwards of 200. The women and children there were much  frightened, expecting it was a boat loaded with mobbers. We  would have stopped and assisted them, but being unarmed, we  thought it best to fulfil our mission. From this onward the  “Mormons” were the only subject of conversation, and nothing was  heard but the most bitter imprecations against them.  related many of his deeds of noble daring in the mob,  one of which was the following: ‘I went, in company with forty  others, to the house of , <a mormon,> in . We got  logs and broke in every door and window at the same instant;  and, pointing our rifles at the family, we told them, we would be  God d—d if we did’nt shoot every one of them, if did  not come out. At that, a tall woman made her appearance, with  a child in her arms. I told the boys she was too d—d tall. In  a moment the boys stripped her, and found it was . I told  them to give him a d—d good one. We gave him sixty or seventy  blows with hickory withes which we had prepared. Then, after  pulling the roof off the house, we went to the next d—d Mormon’s  house, and whipped him in like manner. We continued until  we whipped ten or fifteen of the God d—d Mormons, and demolished  their houses that night. If the Carroll boys would do that way, [p. 13]
1841 Augt. 7. On the 26th. September he started on a mission to the States of Tennessee and Kentucky to collect means to buy out the claims and property of the Mobbers in Mo. During his absence his and two little children were driven by the mob from his habitation, and she was compelled to carry her children three miles through snow three inches deep, and wading through which was waist deep during the inclement weather. He returned about the 25th. of December after a very tedious mission, having travelled 1500 miles, 650 of which were on foot. I extract the following from his journal:
“On the 30th. day of September 1838, I in company with , and went on board the “Kansas”, (which had one wheel broke;) the was very low, & full of snags and sand bars. Generals and of , Coll. Thompson from Platte purchase, and many others of the active mobbers were on board, as also General . On touching at on 1st. October for wood, we found about 70 of the brethren with their families surrounded by an armed mob of upwards of 200. The women and children there were much frightened, expecting it was a boat loaded with mobbers. We would have stopped and assisted them, but being unarmed, we thought it best to fulfil our mission. From this onward the “Mormons” were the only subject of conversation, and nothing was heard but the most bitter imprecations against them. related many of his deeds of noble daring in the mob, one of which was the following: ‘I went, in company with forty others, to the house of , a mormon, in . We got logs and broke in every door and window at the same instant; and, pointing our rifles at the family, we told them, we would be God d—d if we did’nt shoot every one of them, if did not come out. At that, a tall woman made her appearance, with a child in her arms. I told the boys she was too d—d tall. In a moment the boys stripped her, and found it was . I told them to give him a d—d good one. We gave him sixty or seventy blows with hickory withes which we had prepared. Then, after pulling the roof off the house, we went to the next d—d Mormon’s house, and whipped him in like manner. We continued until we whipped ten or fifteen of the God d—d Mormons, and demolished their houses that night. If the Carroll boys would do that way, [p. 13]
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