History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<1841  Augt. 7> they might conquer; but it is no use to think of driving them  without four or five to one. I wish I could stay; I would help  drive the d—d Mormons to hell, old Joe, and all the rest. At  this I looked the sternly in the face, and told him, that he  was neither a republican nor a gentleman, but a savage, without  a single principle of honor <or humanity,>. If, said I, ‘the Mormons have broken  the law, let it be strictly executed against them; but such anti- republican, and unconstitutional acts as these related by you,  are beneath the brutes.’ We were upon the hurricane deck,  and a large company present were listening to the conversation.  While I was speaking, placed his hand upon his pistol,  which was belted under the skirt of his coat; but Cousin  stood by his side, watching every move of his hand, and would  have knocked him into the river instantly, had he attempted to  draw a deadly weapon. But saved him the  trouble, by saying, “I’ll be God d—d to hell if Smith aint right.’  At this, left the company, crest-fallen. In the course of  the conversation said, that best plan was, to rush  into the ‘Mormon’ Settlements, murder the men, make slaves of  the children, take possession of the property, and use the women  as they pleased.
A gentleman present from Baltimore, Maryland, said he  never was among such a pack of d—d savages before; he had  passed through , and saw nothing among the “Mormons”  but good order. Then, drawing his pistols, he discharged them,  and re-loading, said, ‘if God spares my life till I get out of  Upper , I will never be found associating with such  devils again.’
Shortly after this we were invited to preach on board. Elder  Barnes and I preached. The rest of the way we were treated  more civilly; but being deck passengers, and having very little  money, we suffered much for food.
We continued our journey together through every species of  hardship and fatigue, until the eleventh of October, when Elder  Barnes and left us at Paducah after our giving them all  the money we had, they starting up the Ohio river, and we, to visit  the Churches in West Tennessee and Kentucky. Soon after this, Julian  Moses gave us a five franc piece, and bade us farewell.
We soon found that the mob spirit was in Kentucky, as well as [p. 14]
1841 Augt. 7 they might conquer; but it is no use to think of driving them without four or five to one. I wish I could stay; I would help drive the d—d Mormons to hell, old Joe, and all the rest. At this I looked the sternly in the face, and told him, that he was neither a republican nor a gentleman, but a savage, without a single principle of honor or humanity,. If, said I, ‘the Mormons have broken the law, let it be strictly executed against them; but such anti-republican, and unconstitutional acts as these related by you, are beneath the brutes.’ We were upon the hurricane deck, and a large company present were listening to the conversation. While I was speaking, placed his hand upon his pistol, which was belted under the skirt of his coat; but Cousin stood by his side, watching every move of his hand, and would have knocked him into the river instantly, had he attempted to draw a deadly weapon. But saved him the trouble, by saying, “I’ll be God d—d to hell if Smith aint right.’ At this, left the company, crest-fallen. In the course of the conversation said, that best plan was, to rush into the ‘Mormon’ Settlements, murder the men, make slaves of the children, take possession of the property, and use the women as they pleased.
A gentleman present from Baltimore, Maryland, said he never was among such a pack of d—d savages before; he had passed through , and saw nothing among the “Mormons” but good order. Then, drawing his pistols, he discharged them, and re-loading, said, ‘if God spares my life till I get out of Upper , I will never be found associating with such devils again.’
Shortly after this we were invited to preach on board. Elder Barnes and I preached. The rest of the way we were treated more civilly; but being deck passengers, and having very little money, we suffered much for food.
We continued our journey together through every species of hardship and fatigue, until the eleventh of October, when Elder Barnes and left us at Paducah after our giving them all the money we had, they starting up the Ohio river, and we, to visit the Churches in West Tennessee and Kentucky. Soon after this, Julian Moses gave us a five franc piece, and bade us farewell.
We soon found that the mob spirit was in Kentucky, as well as [p. 14]
Page 14