Times and Seasons, 1 August 1842

  • Source Note
Page 868
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TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
MONDAY, AUG. 1, 1842.
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.
There has always been, in every age of the church those who have been opposed to the principles of virtue, who have loved the gain of this present world, followed the principles of unrighteousness, and have been the enemies of truth; hence Paul speaks of certain brethren who “coveted the wages of this present world;” John of others whom he says “went out from us because they were not of us.” Paul in writing to the Corinthian Church tells them that there is fornications among them, even, “such fornications as is not so much as named among the Gentiles; that one should have his father’s wife”—that they defrauded, and that “brother went to law with brother”—that they got drunk when they met to partake of the sacrament; and that many evils existed among them. Peter in prophesying concerning the church says, “But there were false prophets among the people, even as there shall also be false teachers among you, who privily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and shall bring upon themselves swift destruction; and many shall follow their pernicious ways, by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spokea of; and through covetousness shall they with feigned words make merchandise of you; whose judgment of long time lingereth not, and their damnation slumbereth not.” Paul in speaking of the difficulties that he had to encounter, says, “I am in perils at home, in perils among false brethren.” Such is a brief history of that people; and if we examine the history of this church we shall find it much the same: those who have associated with us and made the greatest professions of friendship, have frequently been our greatest enemies and our most determined foes, if they became unpopular, if their interest or dignity was touched, or if they were detected in their iniquity; they were always the first to raise the hand of persecution, to calumniate and villify their brethren, and to seek the downfall and destruction of their friends. In Mo. during the first difficulties there were many like that John speaks of, “they went out from us because they were not of us;” in , when persecution raged, , , , and others whose course of conduct had been the most inconsistent were the first to cry out imposture, and delusion; and while some of them had been engaged in extensive frauds in the Bank, and were the principle cause of its not being able to meet its liabilities; they were the first to cry out speculation and fraud, and to try to palm their iniquities upon the unoffending and innocent; they seized hold of the popular prejudice, aided and abetted in obtaining funds for paper, fraudulently obtained by them, instituted vexatious law-suits and made themselves fat at the expense of the innocent; glutted upon the misery, ruin and distress of their brethren—but with what measure they meted it has been measured to them again.
In the State of we had our , our , , , and others who were the first to flee in time of danger—the first to tell of things that they never knew, and swear to things that they never before had heard of. They were more violent in their persecutions, more relentless and sanguinary in their proceedings, and sought with greater fury the destruction and overthrow of the Saints of God who had never injured them, but whose virtue made them blush for their crimes. All that were there remember that they were the stoutest and the loudest in proclaiming against oppression; they protested vehemently against mob and misrule, but were the first in robbing, spoiling, and plundering their brethren. Such things we have always expected; we know that the “net will gather together of every kind, good and bad,” that “the wheat and tares must grow together until the harvest,” and that even at the last there will be five foolish as well as five wise virgins. Daniel, in referring to the last days says, in speaking concerning the “Holy Covenant,” that many shall have indignation against it, and shall obtain information from those that forsake the Holy Covenant—and the robbers of thy people shall seek to exalt themselves, but they shall fall. This we have fully proven—we have seen them try to exalt themselves. and we have seen their fall. He goes on further to state, that “many shall cleave unto them by flatteries.” Such was , and —with the latter we have to do at the present time, and in many of the foregoing statements and prophecies we shall see his character and conduct exemplified.— He professed the greatest fidelity, and eternal friendship, yet was he an adder in the path, and a viper in the bosom. He professed to be virtuous and chaste, yet did he pierce the heart of the innocent, introduce misery and infamy [p. 868]
——————————
TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
MONDAY, AUG. 1, 1842.
——————————
 
.
There has always been, in every age of the church those who have been opposed to the principles of virtue, who have loved the gain of this present world, followed the principles of unrighteousness, and have been the enemies of truth; hence Paul speaks of certain brethren who “coveted the wages of this present world;” John of others whom he says “went out from us because they were not of us.” Paul in writing to the Corinthian Church tells them that there is fornications among them, even, “such fornications as is not so much as named among the Gentiles; that one should have his father’s wife”—that they defrauded, and that “brother went to law with brother”—that they got drunk when they met to partake of the sacrament; and that many evils existed among them. Peter in prophesying concerning the church says, “But there were false prophets among the people, even as there shall also be false teachers among you, who privily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and shall bring upon themselves swift destruction; and many shall follow their pernicious ways, by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spokea of; and through covetousness shall they with feigned words make merchandise of you; whose judgment of long time lingereth not, and their damnation slumbereth not.” Paul in speaking of the difficulties that he had to encounter, says, “I am in perils at home, in perils among false brethren.” Such is a brief history of that people; and if we examine the history of this church we shall find it much the same: those who have associated with us and made the greatest professions of friendship, have frequently been our greatest enemies and our most determined foes, if they became unpopular, if their interest or dignity was touched, or if they were detected in their iniquity; they were always the first to raise the hand of persecution, to calumniate and villify their brethren, and to seek the downfall and destruction of their friends. In Mo. during the first difficulties there were many like that John speaks of, “they went out from us because they were not of us;” in , when persecution raged, , , , and others whose course of conduct had been the most inconsistent were the first to cry out imposture, and delusion; and while some of them had been engaged in extensive frauds in the Bank, and were the principle cause of its not being able to meet its liabilities; they were the first to cry out speculation and fraud, and to try to palm their iniquities upon the unoffending and innocent; they seized hold of the popular prejudice, aided and abetted in obtaining funds for paper, fraudulently obtained by them, instituted vexatious law-suits and made themselves fat at the expense of the innocent; glutted upon the misery, ruin and distress of their brethren—but with what measure they meted it has been measured to them again.
In the State of we had our , our , , , and others who were the first to flee in time of danger—the first to tell of things that they never knew, and swear to things that they never before had heard of. They were more violent in their persecutions, more relentless and sanguinary in their proceedings, and sought with greater fury the destruction and overthrow of the Saints of God who had never injured them, but whose virtue made them blush for their crimes. All that were there remember that they were the stoutest and the loudest in proclaiming against oppression; they protested vehemently against mob and misrule, but were the first in robbing, spoiling, and plundering their brethren. Such things we have always expected; we know that the “net will gather together of every kind, good and bad,” that “the wheat and tares must grow together until the harvest,” and that even at the last there will be five foolish as well as five wise virgins. Daniel, in referring to the last days says, in speaking concerning the “Holy Covenant,” that many shall have indignation against it, and shall obtain information from those that forsake the Holy Covenant—and the robbers of thy people shall seek to exalt themselves, but they shall fall. This we have fully proven—we have seen them try to exalt themselves. and we have seen their fall. He goes on further to state, that “many shall cleave unto them by flatteries.” Such was , and —with the latter we have to do at the present time, and in many of the foregoing statements and prophecies we shall see his character and conduct exemplified.— He professed the greatest fidelity, and eternal friendship, yet was he an adder in the path, and a viper in the bosom. He professed to be virtuous and chaste, yet did he pierce the heart of the innocent, introduce misery and infamy [p. 868]
Page 868