John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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Bill referred to; (Insert the Bill) After the passage of the Bill, the Marshall, , was ordered to abate or remove it, which he forthwith proceeded to do, by summoning a posse of men for that purpose. The press was removed, or broken, I dont know which, by the , and the type scattered in the street.
This seemed to be one of those extreme cases that require extreme remedies measures, as the press was still proceeding in its inflamitory course, it was feared that as it was almost universally execrated, should it continue longer, an indignant people might commit some overt act which might lead to serious consequences; and that it was better to use legal, than illegal means.
This as was foreseen was the very course our enemies wished us to pursue, as it afforded them an opportunity of circulating a very plausible story about the Mormons being opposed to the liberty of the press, and of free speech which they were not slow to avail themselves of; stories were fabricated and facts perverted; false statements were made; and this act brought in as an example to sustain the whole of their fabrications, and, as if inspired by Satan, they labored with an energy and zeal worthy of a better cause. They had runners to circulate their reports, not only through ; but in all the surrounding Counties; these reports were communicated to their Anti-Mormon Societies, and these societies circulated them in their several districts. The Anti-Mormon paper the [p. 10]
Bill referred to; (Insert the Bill) After the passage of the Bill, the Marshall, , was ordered to abate or remove it, which he forthwith proceeded to do, by summoning a posse of men for that purpose. The press was removed, or broken, I dont know which, by the , and the type scattered in the street.
This seemed to be one of those extreme cases that require extreme measures, as the press was still proceeding in its inflamitory course, it was feared that as it was almost universally execrated, should it continue longer, an indignant people might commit some overt act which might lead to serious consequences; and that it was better to use legal, than illegal means.
This as was foreseen was the very course our enemies wished us to pursue, as it afforded them an opportunity of circulating a very plausible story about the Mormons being opposed to the liberty of the press, and of free speech which they were not slow to avail themselves of; stories were fabricated and facts perverted; false statements were made; and this act brought in as an example to sustain the whole of their fabrications, and, as if inspired by Satan, they labored with an energy and zeal worthy of a better cause. They had runners to circulate their reports, not only through ; but in all the surrounding Counties; these reports were communicated to their Anti-Mormon Societies, and these societies circulated them in their several districts. The Anti-Mormon paper the [p. 10]
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