John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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[pp. 33–36 missing]
as they deserved. The principles of equal rights that have been instilled into our bosoms, from our cradles, as American citizens forbid us submitting to every foul indignity and succumbing to and pandering to wretches so infamous as these. But independent of this, the course that we pursued we considered to be strictly legal; for notwithstanding the insult, we were anxious to be governed strictly by law and therefore convened the City Council; and, being desirous in our deliberations to abide law, summoned legal counsel to be present on the occasion. Upon investigating the matter we found that our City Charter gave us power to remove all nuisances; and furthermore upon consulting Blackstone upon what might be considered <​a​> nuisance, that distinguished lawyer, who is considered authority, I believe, in all our courts, states among other things that “A libellous and filthy press may be considered a nuisance and abated as such.” Here then one of the most eminent English Barristers whose works are considered standard with us declares that a libellous and filthy press may be considered a nuisance, and our own Charter, given up by the Legislature of this State, gives us the power to remove nuisances, and [consi]dering that press abated as a nuisance, we conceived that we were acting strictly in accor[dance] [p. 37]
[pp. 33–36 missing]
as they deserved. The principles of equal rights that have been instilled into our bosoms, from our cradles, as American citizens forbid us submitting to every foul indignity and succumbing and pandering to wretches so infamous as these. But independent of this, the course that we pursued we considered to be strictly legal; for notwithstanding the insult, we were anxious to be governed strictly by law and therefore convened the City Council; and, being desirous in our deliberations to abide law, summoned legal counsel to be present on the occasion. Upon investigating the matter we found that our City Charter gave us power to remove all nuisances; and furthermore upon consulting Blackstone upon what might be considered a nuisance, that distinguished lawyer, who is considered authority, I believe, in all our courts, states among other things that “A libellous and filthy press may be considered a nuisance and abated as such.” Here then one of the most eminent English Barristers whose works are considered standard with us declares that a libellous and filthy press may be considered a nuisance, and our own Charter, given up by the Legislature of this State, gives us the power to remove nuisances, and considering that press abated as a nuisance, we conceived that we were acting strictly in accordance [p. 37]
Page 37