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Introduction to Millet for the use of JS v. Woodstock

Millet for the use of JS v. Woodstock
Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., Ohio, Justice of the Peace Court, 20 July 1837
 
Historical Introduction
On 9 March 1837, Willard Woodstock, a member of the church’s high council in , Ohio, borrowed $1.85 from . The debt was payable when drawn, or upon presentation of the promissory note by the creditor to the debtor. Whether the promissory note reflected a debt for goods or services rendered by to Woodstock or was a sum formally borrowed is unstated. The terms of the note are also absent. Sometime after extending the loan, assigned the note to JS, who, as new owner of the note, sued Woodstock for payment. JS spent much of the summer and fall of 1837 involved in litigation for unpaid debts, likely exacerbated by the financial panic of 1837. Just as several of his creditors took him to court in 1837, JS in turn sought to recoup debts owed to him. As a justice of the peace in , ordered the constable, Burton H. Phelps, to summon Woodstock to court. Woodstock did not appear, so the court rendered judgment against him. No record of payment is extant.
 
Calendar of Documents
 
9 March 1837 Willard Woodstock, Promissory Note, Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., OH, to Artemus Millet
9 Mar. 1837. Not extant.
 
Millet for the use of JS v. Woodstock, Justice of the Peace Court
 
15 July 1837 Oliver Cowdery, Summons, to Burton H. Phelps, Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., OH
15 July 1837. Not extant.
 
Ca. 20 July 1837 Docket Entry, Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., OH
Ca. 20 July 1837; Cowdery, Docket Book, 117; handwriting of Burton Phelps.
Millet for the use of JS v. Woodstock
Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., Ohio, Justice of the Peace Court, 20 July 1837
 
Historical Introduction
On 9 March 1837, Willard Woodstock, a member of the church’s high council in , Ohio, borrowed $1.85 from . The debt was payable when drawn, or upon presentation of the promissory note by the creditor to the debtor. Whether the promissory note reflected a debt for goods or services rendered by to Woodstock or was a sum formally borrowed is unstated. The terms of the note are also absent. Sometime after extending the loan, assigned the note to JS, who, as new owner of the note, sued Woodstock for payment. JS spent much of the summer and fall of 1837 involved in litigation for unpaid debts, likely exacerbated by the financial panic of 1837. Just as several of his creditors took him to court in 1837, JS in turn sought to recoup debts owed to him. As a justice of the peace in , ordered the constable, Burton H. Phelps, to summon Woodstock to court. Woodstock did not appear, so the court rendered judgment against him. No record of payment is extant.
 
Calendar of Documents
 
9 March 1837 Willard Woodstock, Promissory Note, Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., OH, to Artemus Millet
9 Mar. 1837. Not extant.
 
Millet for the use of JS v. Woodstock, Justice of the Peace Court
 
15 July 1837 Oliver Cowdery, Summons, to Burton H. Phelps, Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., OH
15 July 1837. Not extant.
 
Ca. 20 July 1837 Docket Entry, Kirtland Township, Geauga Co., OH
Ca. 20 July 1837; Cowdery, Docket Book, 117; handwriting of Burton Phelps.